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Approximate Algorithms and Heuristics for MAX-SAT

  • Roberto Battiti
  • Marco Protasi
Chapter

Abstract

In the Maximum Satisfiability (MAX-SAT) problem one is given a Boolean formula in conjunctive normal form, i.e., as a conjunction of clauses, each clause being a disjunction. The task is to find an assignment of truth values to the variables that satisfies the maximum number of clauses.

Keywords

Local Search Integer Linear Programming Performance Ratio Approximate Algorithm Truth Assignment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberto Battiti
    • 1
  • Marco Protasi
    • 2
  1. 1.Dipartimento di MatematicaUniversità di TrentoPovo (Trento)Italy
  2. 2.Dipartimento di MatematicaUniversità di Roma “Tor Vergata”RomaItaly

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