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Mississippi Fan Sedimentary Facies, Composition, and Texture

  • Dorrik A. V. Stow
  • Michel Cremer
  • Laurence Droz
  • William R. Normark
  • Suzanne O’Connell
  • Kevin T. Pickering
  • Charles E. Stelting
  • Audrey A. Meyer-Wright
  • DSDP Leg 96 Shipboard Scientists
Chapter
Part of the Frontiers in Sedimentary Geology book series (SEDIMENTARY)

Abstract

Eight different sedimentary facies recognized in the Mississippi Fan sediments drilled during DSDP Leg 96 are defined on the basis of lithology, sedimentary structures, composition, and texture. Pelagic biogenic sediments are of minor importance volumetrically compared with the dominant resedimented terrigenous facies. Clays, muds, and silts are most abundant at all sites, with some sands and gravels within the mid-fan channel fill and an abundance of sand on the lower fanlobe. Facies distribution and vertical sequences reflect the importance of sediment type and supply in controlling fan development.

Keywords

Debris Flow Sedimentary Facies Turbidite System Biogenic Sediment Primary Sedimentary Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dorrik A. V. Stow
  • Michel Cremer
  • Laurence Droz
  • William R. Normark
  • Suzanne O’Connell
  • Kevin T. Pickering
  • Charles E. Stelting
  • Audrey A. Meyer-Wright
  • DSDP Leg 96 Shipboard Scientists

There are no affiliations available

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