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Relationships in the Real World: The Descriptive Psychology Approach to Personal Relationships

  • Keith E. Davis
  • Mary K. Roberts
Part of the Springer Series in Social Psychology book series (SSSOC)

Abstract

Just as there is an important sense in which persons construct their lives from the social resources available to them, so also do they construct relationships. In what follows, we shall try to do justice to both the human creativity exhibited in such constructions and to the constraints upon such constructions imposed both by personal limitations and restrictions in opportunity. In doing so, we shall present a framework for understanding personal relationships that draws upon three resources within Descriptive Psychology.

Keywords

Social Support Life Satisfaction Romantic Relationship Social Practice Personal Relationship 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith E. Davis
  • Mary K. Roberts

There are no affiliations available

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