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Cognitive Development in Autistic Children

  • Gayle I. Goldstein
  • David F. Lancy
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

Autism begins at birth or shortly thereafter. Often the first sign parents have that their infant is “different” is that the child is made uncomfortable by human contact and interaction, rather than the reverse, which is normally the case. Where normal infants actively make a visual, auditory, and tactile search of their environment, autistic infants remain relatively passive, staring into space. He or she is an indifferent feeder, and sleeps fitfully. The inactive infant becomes a reluctant toddler; there are delays in various sensorimotor milestones, most notably in speech onset and development. From an early age the autistic child engages in various self-stimulating and stereotypic behaviors, such as flapping his fingers in front of his face, lining up wooden blocks in a row, or just sitting quietly in a corner, rocking back and forth (Morgan, 1981).

Keywords

Cognitive Development Normal Child Autistic Child Retarded Child Autistic Subject 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gayle I. Goldstein
  • David F. Lancy

There are no affiliations available

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