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Climatic Characteristics of the Taiga in Interior Alaska

  • C. W. Slaughter
  • L. A. Viereck
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 57)

Abstract

The studies described in this volume were conducted in the boreal forest zone of central Alaska. This high-latitude setting has a continental climate characterized by low annual precipitation (285 mm at Fairbanks), low humidity, low cloudiness, and large diurnal and annual temperature ranges (Haugen et al. 1982). The coldest month is January, with a mean daily temperature of -24.4°C, while July has a mean daily temperature of +17.1°C. In winter, strong, stable temperature inversions are common due to intense long-wave radiation cooling during long periods of low sun angle, darkness, and typically cloud-free conditions. Snow commonly covers the entire landscape from October through mid-April (average, 214 days in Fairbanks); the frost-free summer at Fairbanks averages 97 days (Haugen et al. 1982).

Keywords

Geophysical Institute Equivalent Latitude Aspen Stand North Aspect Seasonal Snowpack 
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. W. Slaughter
  • L. A. Viereck

There are no affiliations available

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