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Patch-Within-Patch Restoration of Man-Modified Landscapes Within Texas State Parks

  • Tom D. Hayes
  • David H. Riskind
  • W. Lynn PaceIII
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 64)

Abstract

Natural reserves serve many important purposes in anthropogenically dominated landscapes. Management of reserves in the face of past or present landscape disturbance remains a challenge. The initial interest regarding ecosystem reserves focuses on the theory and practice of preserve design and various priority schemes for preserve acquisition (May 1975; Williams 1975; Diamond 1975; Whitcomb et al. 1976; Simberloff and Abele 1976; Pickett and Thompson 1978; Polunin and Eidsvik 1979; Margules et al. 1982). Discussions deal primarily with preserve effectiveness in terms of comparisons of immigration and extinction rates developed through modeling based on island biogeographic theory. The advantages and disadvantages of large versus small preserves have been debated with biological diversity or species richness being the raison d’etre for preservation (Higgs and Usher 1980; Janzen 1983). Such esoterica as integration of global warming factors into preserve design have recently appeared in the ecological literature (Peters and Darling 1985).

Keywords

Sheepshead Minnow Edwards Plateau Rolling Plain Texas Park Wildlife Department 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tom D. Hayes
    • 1
  • David H. Riskind
  • W. Lynn PaceIII
  1. 1.Environmental Assessment Branch. Resource Protection DivisionTexas Parks and Wildlife DepartmentAustinUSA

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