Advertisement

Biofilms in Potable Water Distribution Systems

  • E. van der Wende
  • W. G. Characklis
Part of the Brock/Springer Series in Contemporary Bioscience book series (BROCK/SPRINGER)

Abstract

High bacterial populations in potable water distribution systems, sometimes referred to as events or blooms, have troubled utilities because of their possible implications for the hygienic safety and taste and odor of their product. Before considering the contribution of biofilm accumulation to these high bacterial populations in distribution systems, some terminology must be clarified with regard to drinking water bacteriology.

Keywords

Pipe Wall Water Distribution System Planktonic Cell Free Chlorine Chlorine Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Allen, M.J., Taylor, H., and Geldreich, E.E. 1980. The occurrence of microorganisms in water main encrustations. American Water Works Association Journal 72: 614–625.Google Scholar
  2. Banerji, S.K. 1978. Quality deterioration in mains. Journal of the Missouri Water & Sewage Conference 1: 46–56.Google Scholar
  3. Brazos, B.J. and O’Connor, J.T. 1985. A transmission electron micrograph survey of the planktonic bacteria population in chlorinated and nonchlorinated drinking water. Proceedings, Water Quality Technology Conference: Advances in Water Analysis and Treatment. Houston, TX, 275–305.Google Scholar
  4. Characklis W.G. 1988. Bacterial Regrowth in Distribution Systems. Research Report. American Water Works Association Research Foundation. Denver, CO, 107–114.Google Scholar
  5. Characklis, W.G., Trulear, M.G., Stathopoulos, N., and Chang, L.C. 1980. Oxidation and destruction of microbial films, pp. 349–368 in Jolley, R.L., W.A. Brungs, R.B. Cumming, and V.A. Jacobs (eds.). Water Chlorination: Environmental Impact and Health Effects, Ann Arbor Science Publishers, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI.Google Scholar
  6. Colbourne, J.S., Dennis, P.J., Trew, R.M., Berry, C., and Vesey, G. 1988. Legionella and public water supplies. Proceedings, International Conference on Water and Wastewater Microbiology. Newport Beach, CA.Google Scholar
  7. Haudidier, K., Paquin, J.L., Francais, T., Hartemann, P., Grapin, G., Colin, F., Jourdain, M.J., Block, J.C., Cheron,J., Pascal, O., Levi, Y., and Miazga, J. 1988. Biofilm growth in drinking water network: a preliminary industrial pilot plant experiment. Proceedings, International Conference on Water and Wastewater Microbiology. Newport Beach, CA.Google Scholar
  8. Jacangelo, J.G. and Olivieri, V.P. 1985. Aspects of the mode of action of monochloramine. pp. 575–586 in R.L. Jolley, R.J. Bull, W.P. Davis, S. Katz, M.H. Roberts, Jr., and V.A. Jacobs (eds.). Water Chlorination, Chemistry, Environmental Impact and Health Effects, Lewis Publishers Inc., Chelsea, MI.Google Scholar
  9. Kelly, A.J., Justice, C.A., and Nagy, L.A. 1983. Predominance of chlorine tolerant bacteria in drinking water systems. Abstracts Annual Meeting American Society for Microbiology 0, Q122.Google Scholar
  10. LeChevallier, M.W., Babcock, T.M., and Lee, R.G. 1987. Examination and characterization of distribution system biofilms. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 53: 2714–2724.Google Scholar
  11. Lee, S.H., O’Connor, J.T., and Banerji, S.K. 1977. Biologically mediated deterioration of water quality in distribution systems. Proceedings, American Water Works Association 5th Annual Water Quality Technology Conference. Kansas City, MO.Google Scholar
  12. Maki, J.S., LaCroix, S.J., Hopkins, B.S., and Staley, J.T. 1986. Recovery and diversity of heterotrophic bacteria from chlorinated drinking water. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 51: 1047–1055.Google Scholar
  13. McFeters, G.A., Kippin, J.S., and LeChevallier, M.W 1986. Injured coliforms in drinking water. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 51: 1–5.Google Scholar
  14. O’Connor, J.T. and Banerji, S.K. 1984. Biologically Mediated Corrosion and Water Quality Deterioration in Distribution Systems. EPA-600/52-84-056. U.S. Environmental Protecting Agency, Cincinnati, OH.Google Scholar
  15. Olivieri, V.P., Dennis, W.H., Snead, M.C., Richfield, D.T., and Kruse, C.W. 1980. Reaction of chlorine and chloramines with nucleic acids under disinfection conditions, pp. 651–653 in Jolley, R.L., W.A. Brungs, R.B. Cumming, and V.A. Jacobs (eds.), Water Chlorination: Environmental Impact and Health Effects, Ann Arbor Science Publishers, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI.Google Scholar
  16. Ridgway, H.F. and Olson, B.H. 1982. Chlorine resistance pattern of bacteria from 2 drinking water systems. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 44: 972–987.Google Scholar
  17. Ridgway, H.F. and Olson, B.H. 1981. Scanning electron microscope evidence for bacterial colonization of a drinking-water distribution system. Applied and Environmental Mcrobiology 41: 274–287.Google Scholar
  18. Siegrist, H. and Guver, W. 1985. Mass transfer mechanisms in a heterotrophic biofilm. Water Research 19: 1369–1378.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Tuovinen, O.H., Button, K.S., Vuorinen, A., Carlson, L., Mair, D.M., and Yut, L.A. 1980. Bacterial, chemical and mineralogical characterization of tubercles in distribution pipelines. Journal of the American Water Works Association. 72: 626–635.Google Scholar
  20. van der Kooij, D. and Hijnen, W.A.M. 1982. Nutritional versatility of a starch-utilizing flavobacterium at low substrate concentrations. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 45: 804–810.Google Scholar
  21. van der Kooij, D., Visser, A., and Oranje, J.P. 1982. Multiplication of fluorescent Pseudomonas at low substrate concentrations in tap water. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 48: 229–243.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. van der Kooij, D., Visser, A., and Oranje, J.P. 1982. Multiplication of fluorescent Pseudomonas at low substrate concentrations in tap water. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 48: 229–243.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Wolfe, R.L., Ward, N.R., and Olson, B.H. 1985. Inactivation of heterotrophic bacterial populations in finished drinking water by chlorine and chloramines. Water Research 19: 1393–1404.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. van der Wende
    • 1
  • W. G. Characklis
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Biological and Chemical Process AnalysisMontana State UniversityBozemanUSA

Personalised recommendations