The Superior Olivary Complex and Lateral Lemniscal Nuclei

  • Ilsa R. Schwartz
Part of the Springer Handbook of Auditory Research book series (SHAR, volume 1)

Abstract

The superior olivary complex (SOC) is a group of interrelated nuclei located on each side of the brainstem at the level of the cochlear nuclei (CN). The SOC lies just rostral to the facial nucleus and between the roots of the facial and abducens nerves. The SOC is the first level of the auditory system at which there is integration of information from the two ears onto individual neurons. The integrated information is transferred to other cells within the SOC for further processing and to higher centers, the nuclei of the lateral lemniscus (LL) and inferior colliculus (IC), as well as back down to the CN and cochlea. The lateral lemnisci are bands of fibers running from the lateral side and rostral end of each SOC to the ipsilateral IC. Groups of neurons, the LL nuclei, are located within the LL. Axons from the CN and trapezoid body also contribute to the LL. The LL nuclei integrate information directly from the CN, from the SOC, and from the contralateral LL before transmitting it to the IC. The LL neurons may also interact with reticular formation pathways.

Keywords

Inferior Colliculus Cochlear Nucleus Lateral Superior Olive Superior Olivary Complex Medial Superior Olive 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

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  • Ilsa R. Schwartz

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