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The Dialectics of Forgetting and Remembering Across the Adult Lifespan

  • Cameron J. Camp
  • Leslie A. McKitrick

Abstract

Memory and forgetting are in a balance. We rely on memory to hold the structure of the world in place and we rely on forgetting to rethink the world anew. To forgive is often to forget. To live a full life experiencing the intensity of each moment is to be always shedding old concretions of structure so that the novelty has room to reappear. (Klass, 1986, p. 1)

Keywords

Memory Trace Human Memory Adult Lifespan Proactive Inhibition Retrieval Failure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cameron J. Camp
  • Leslie A. McKitrick

There are no affiliations available

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