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Phonological Awareness and Its Roles in Learning to Read and Spell

  • Rebecca Treiman
Part of the Springer Series in Language and Communication book series (SSLAN, volume 28)

Abstract

In many cases, a program of research originates through the influence of a few special people. For me, the special people who first inspired my interest in phonological awareness, reading, and spelling were Alvin and Isabelle Liberman. Alvin Liberman, who was my teacher when I was an undergraduate linguistics major at Yale University from 1972 to 1976, introduced me to this fascinating area of research. Under his direction, I carried out a study of syllable and phoneme awareness among schoolchildren in New Haven, Connecticut. This study touched on many of the issues that continue to interest me, including whether some linguistic units are more accessible than others and the nature of the relationship between phonological awareness and reading. When I entered graduate school in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, I was fortunate to find an advisor—Jonathan Baron—who nurtured my interest in the psychology of reading and who helped me to expand my research skills. Without the influence of Alvin and Isabelle Liberman and Jonathan Baron, the program of research that I describe in this chapter would not have been possible.

Keywords

Phonological Awareness Real Word Phonemic Awareness Spelling Error Nonword Reading 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

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  • Rebecca Treiman

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