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Chemical Warfare Agents: Estimating Oral Reference Doses

  • Dennis M. Opresko
  • Robert A. Young
  • Rosmarie A. Faust
  • Sylvia S. Talmage
  • Annetta P. Watson
  • Robert H. Ross
  • Kowetha A. Davidson
  • Joe King
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 156)

Abstract

The FY 1993 Defense Authorization Act [Public Law (PL) 102–484, Sect. 176] directed the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) 1 to examine the scale of effort and consider plans needed to safely dispose of nonstockpile chemical materiel (NSCM), previously identified as an area of national concern in House Appropriations Report 101–822 from the FY 1991 Defense Appropriations Act. Non-stockpile chemical materiel is defined in the Appropriations Report as “… lethal wastes from past disposal efforts, unserviceable munitions, chemically contaminated containers, chemical production facilities, subsequently located chemical munitions, sites known to contain significant concentrations of buried chemical weapons and waste, and binary weapons and components.” Items considered NSCM are further characterized as chemical materiel outside of the U.S. retaliatory stockpile of lethal chemical agents and munitions (described more fully in Carnes and Watson 1989; DA 1988).

Keywords

Nerve Agent Sulfur Mustard Chemical Warfare Agent Neuropathy Target Esterase Methyl Phosphonic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis M. Opresko
    • 1
  • Robert A. Young
    • 1
  • Rosmarie A. Faust
    • 1
  • Sylvia S. Talmage
    • 1
  • Annetta P. Watson
    • 1
  • Robert H. Ross
    • 1
  • Kowetha A. Davidson
    • 1
  • Joe King
    • 2
  1. 1.Life Sciences DivisionOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA
  2. 2.U.S. Army Environmental CenterUSA

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