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Polyacrylates

  • Julia E. Babensee
  • Michael V. Sefton

Abstract

The suitability of a polymer for microencapsulation of cells is determined by its processability (e.g., its viscosity and solubility, especially in solvents that are tolerated by the cells), its permselectivity in the form of the microcapsule wall, and its biocompatibility. The capsule wall must have a high permeability to nutrients and cell-derived products, yet must exclude antibodies, complement components, and inflammatory and immune cells. Since the surface chemistry has a large role in defining the capsule biocompatibility, it too is significant. An understanding of the influence of various factors such as polymer chemistry and microencapsulation conditions is our research objective. We have focused on using polyacrylates for microencapsulation with the view to deepening our understanding of these issues.

Keywords

PC12 Cell HepG2 Cell Capsule Wall Encapsulation Process Capsule Core 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia E. Babensee
  • Michael V. Sefton

There are no affiliations available

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