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Biomag 96 pp 1146-1149 | Cite as

Multiple Modality Biomagnetic Analysis System

  • K. Martin
  • S. Erne
  • C. Law
  • S. Conforto
  • J. Mallick
  • B. Tatar

Abstract

As an emerging new modality, biomagnetic analysis presents exciting opportunities while raising some difficult issues. During the past four years researchers at General Electric, The University of Ulm and The University of Chieti have created a state of the art biomagnetic analysis system, and have addressed many of these difficulties. One of the critical aspects of a biomagnetic analysis system is how it handles different types of data. Many of the clinical requirements for a successful system require fast, efficient and flexible data management. This paper describes what those requirements are and how we addressed them. We start by providing a high level overview of our system. We then list some of the pertinent clinical requirements, present our solutions and describe how well they have worked. Finally we discuss future directions.

Keywords

Band Pass Filter Sensor Head High Level Overview Marching Cube Data Pipeline 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Martin
    • 1
  • S. Erne
    • 2
  • C. Law
    • 1
  • S. Conforto
    • 3
  • J. Mallick
    • 1
  • B. Tatar
    • 1
  1. 1.GE Corporate R&DSchenectadyUSA
  2. 2.Institute for Biomedical EngineeringUniversity UlmUlmGermany
  3. 3.Institute of Advanced Biomedical TechnologiesChietiItaly

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