Understanding Mobile Notification Management in Collocated Groups

  • Joel E. Fischer
  • Stuart Reeves
  • Stuart Moran
  • Chris Greenhalgh
  • Steve Benford
  • Stefan Rennick-Egglestone
Conference paper

Abstract

We present an observational study of how notifications are handled by collocated groups, in the context of a collaborative mobile photo-taking exercise. Interaction analysis of video recordings is used to uncover the methodical ways in which participants manage notifications, establishing and sustaining co-oriented interaction to coordinate action, such as sharing notification contents and deciding on courses of action. Findings highlight how embodied and technological resources are collectively drawn upon in situationally nuanced ways to achieve the management of notifications delivered to cohorts. The insights can be used to develop an understanding of how interruptions are dealt with in other settings, and to reflect on how to support notification management within collocated groups by design.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joel E. Fischer
    • 1
  • Stuart Reeves
    • 1
  • Stuart Moran
    • 1
  • Chris Greenhalgh
    • 1
  • Steve Benford
    • 1
  • Stefan Rennick-Egglestone
    • 1
  1. 1.The Mixed Reality LaboratoryUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamshireUK

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