Islam and Circumcision

Chapter

Abstract

Circumcision is a universal practice that is greatly influenced by cultural and religious traditions. It is the most frequent operation on males not only in Islamic countries, but also other parts of the world [1, 2]. For example, in the USA more than one million male infants are circumcised each year ‎[3]. It is estimated that one-third of the global male population is circumcised ‎[4, 5].

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Pediatric Urology, Department of UrologyCairo University Specialized Pediatric HospitalCairoEgypt
  2. 2.Department of Surgery, Division of UrologyUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA

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