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Mast Cell Biology: Introduction and Overview

  • Alasdair M. Gilfillan
  • Sarah J. Austin
  • Dean D. Metcalfe
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 716)

Abstract

In recent years, the field of mast cell biology has expanded well beyond the boundaries of atopic disorders and anaphy laxis, on which it has been historically focused. The biochemical and signaling events responsible for the development and regulation of mast cells has been increasingly studied, aided in large part by novel breakthroughs in laboratory techniques used to study these cells. The result of these studies has been a more comprehensive definition of mast cells that includes added insights to their overall biology as well as the various disease states that can now be traced to defects in mast cells. This introductory chapter outlines and highlights the various topics of mast cell biology that will be discussed in further detail in subsequent chapters.

Keywords

Mast Cell Mast Cell Activation Human Mast Cell Uman Mast Mouse Mast Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Landes Bioscience and Springer Science+Business Media 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alasdair M. Gilfillan
    • 1
  • Sarah J. Austin
    • 1
  • Dean D. Metcalfe
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Allergic DiseasesNational Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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