International Statistical Comparisons of Occupational and Social Structures

Problems, Possibilities and the Role of ISCO-88
  • Eivind Hoffmann

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to present ILO’s work with the International Standard Classification of Occupations (ISCO-88) as well as general issues of importance for the creation of data sets which can be used for comparative statistical studies of social and economic structures and their changes.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

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  • Eivind Hoffmann

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