The Functional Anatomy of Skeletal Conditioning

  • Germund Hesslow
  • Christopher H. Yeo

Abstract

The nervous system mediates responses to a wide variety of stimuli. For example, a painful stimulus to the sole of the foot will elicit a rapid contraction of flexor muscles in the leg to withdraw the foot. Bright light reaching the retina elicits the pupillary reflex that serves to constrict the pupil and reduce the amount of light passing through it. Irritation of the lining of the nose can cause a sneeze. All reflexes are elicited by specific stimuli and all are relatively consistent and stereotyped in their appearance.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Germund Hesslow
  • Christopher H. Yeo

There are no affiliations available

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