Emotional Cognition: Theory of Mind and Face Recognition

Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

In the relevant literature, several authors1 have described a variety of skills that are necessary to develop emotional competence and emotional self-efficacy, even psychological well-being, in social situations.

References

  1. Abbeduto, L., & Murphy, M. M. (2004). Language, social cognition, maladaptive behavior and communication in Down syndrome and Fragile X syndrome. In M. L. Rice & S. F. Warren (Eds.), Developmental language disorders. From phenotypes to etiologies (pp. 77–97). London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers.Google Scholar
  2. Adams, C., Green, J., Gilchrist, A., & Cox, A. (2002). Conversational behaviour of children with Asperger syndrome and conduct disorder. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 43, 679–690.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Adolphs, R., Sears, L., & Piven, J. (2001). Abnormal processing of social information from faces in autism. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 13, 232–240.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Adrien, J. L. (1996). Autisme du jeune enfant: Développement psychologique et régulation de l’activité. Paris: Expansion Scientifique Française.Google Scholar
  5. Alcantara, J. I., Weisblatt, E. J., Moore, B. C., & Bolton, P. F. (2004). Speech-in-noise perception in high functioning individuals with autism or Asperger’s syndrome. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 45, 1107–1114.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Antonietti, A., Sempoi, O. L., & Marchetti, A. (2006). Theory of mind and language in developmental contexts. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  7. Apperly, I. A., Samson, D., & Humphreys, G. W. (2005). Domain-specificity and theory of mind: Evaluating neuropsychological evidence. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 9, 572–577.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Argott, P., Buffington Townsend, D., Sturmey, P., & Poulson, C. L. (2008). Increasing the use of empathic statements in the presence of a non-verbal affective stimulus in adolescents with autism. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2, 341–352.Google Scholar
  9. Ashwin, C., Wheelwright, S., & Baron-Cohen, S. (2006). Attention bias to faces in Asperger syndrome: A pictorial emotion stroop study. Psychological Medicine, 36, 835–843.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Attwood, A., Frith, U., & Hermelin, B. (1988). The understanding and use of interpersonal gestures by autistic and Down’s syndrome children. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 18, 241–257.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Bacon, A. L., Fein, D., Morris, R., Waterhouse, L., & Allen, D. (1998). The responses of autistic children to the distress of others. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 28, 129–142.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Balconi, M., & Carrera, A. (2006). Emotional representation in facial expression and script: A comparison between normal and autistic children. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 28, 409–422.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Banerjee, M. (1997). Hidden emotion: Preschoolers’ knowledge of appearance-reality and emotion display rules. Social Cognition, 15, 107–132.Google Scholar
  14. Bar-Haim, Y., Shulman, C., Lamy, D., & Reuveni, A. (2006). Attention to eyes and mouth in high-functioning children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36, 2006.Google Scholar
  15. Baranek, G. T. (1999). Autism during infancy: A retrospective video analysis of sensory-motor and social behaviours at 9–12 months of age. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 29, 213–224.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Barisnikov, K., Hippolyte, L., Urben, S., & Pizzo, R. (2009). The knowledge of social rules: A developmental study. Paper presented at the 11th Congress of the Swiss Psychological Society, August 19th–20th, University of Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel, Switzerland.Google Scholar
  17. Barna, J., & Legerstee, M. (2005). Nine- and twelve-month-old infants relate emotions to people’s actions. Cognition & Emotion, 19, 53–67.Google Scholar
  18. Baron-Cohen, S. (1988). Social and pragmatic deficits in autism: Cognitive or affective? Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 18, 379–402.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Baron-Cohen, S. (1989a). The autistic child’s theory of mind: A case of specific developmental delay. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 30, 285–298.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. Baron-Cohen, S. (1989b). Are autistic children behaviourists? An examination of their mental–physical and appearance–reality distinctions. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 19, 579–600.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. Baron-Cohen, S. (1991a). The development of a theory of mind in autism: Deviance and delay? Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 14, 33–51.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. Baron-Cohen, S. (1991b). Do people with autism understand what causes emotion? Child Development, 62, 385–395.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. Baron-Cohen, S. (1991c). Precursors to a theory of mind: Understanding attention in others. In A. Whiten (Ed.), The emergence of mindreading: The evolution development, and simulation or second-order mental representation (pp. 233–251). Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  24. Baron-Cohen, S. (1995). Mindblindness: An essay on autism and theory of mind. London: The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  25. Baron-Cohen, S. (1999). La cécité mentale dans l’autisme. Enfance, 3, 285–293.Google Scholar
  26. Baron-Cohen, S. (2000). From attention-goal psychology to belief-desire psychology: The development of a theory of mind and its dysfunction. In S. Baron-Cohen, H. Tager-Flusberg, & D. J. Cohen (Eds.), Understanding other minds: Perspectives for autism (pp. 59–82). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  27. Baron-Cohen, S. (2004). Mind reading: The interactive guide to emotions. [computer software]. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. http://www.jkp.com/mindreading Google Scholar
  28. Baron-Cohen, S., & Hammer, J. (1997c). Parents of children with Asperger syndrome: What is the cognitive phenotype? Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 9, 548–554.Google Scholar
  29. Baron-Cohen, S., Jolliffe, T., Mortimore, C., & Robertson, M. (1997b). Another advanced test of theory of mind: Evidence from very high functioning adults with autism or Asperger syndrome. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 38, 813–822.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  30. Baron-Cohen, S., Leslie, A. M., & Frith, U. (1985). Does the autistic child have a “theory of mind”? Cognition, 21, 37–46.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  31. Baron-Cohen, S., Leslie, A. M., & Frith, U. (1986). Mechanical, behavioural and intentional understanding of picture stories in autistic children. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 4, 113–125.Google Scholar
  32. Baron-Cohen, S., Ring, H., Moriarty, J., Schmitz, B., Costa, D., & Ell, P. (1994). The brain basis of theory of mind: The role of the orbitofrontal region. British Journal of Psychiatry, 165, 640–649.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  33. Baron-Cohen, S., Spitz, A., & Cross, P. (1993). Do children with autism recognize surprise? A research note. Cognition and Emotion, 7, 507–516.Google Scholar
  34. Baron-Cohen, S., & Swettenham, J. (1997a). Theory of mind in autism: Its relationship to executive function and central coherence. In D. J. Cohen & F. R. Volkmar (Eds.), Handbook for autism and pervasive developmental disorders (pp. 880–893). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  35. Baron-Cohen, S., Tager-Flusberg, H., & Cohen, D. J. (2000). Understanding other minds: Perspectives from autism and developmental neuroscience (2nd ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  36. Baron-Cohen, S., Wheelwright, S., Hill, J., Raste, Y., & Plumb, I. (2001). The “Reading the Mind in the Eyes” Test revised version: A study with normal adults, and adults with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 42, 241–251.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  37. Bauminger, N. (2002). The facilitation of social-emotional understanding and social interaction in high-functioning children with autism: Intervention outcomes. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 32, 283–298.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  38. Bauminger, N. (2004). The expression and understanding of jealousy in children with autism. Development and Psychopathology, 16, 157–177.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  39. Bauminger, N., & Kasari, C. (1999). Brief report: Theory of mind in high-functioning children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 29, 81–86.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  40. Begeer, S., Koot, H. M., Rieffe, C., Meerum Terwogt, M., & Stegge, H. (2008). Emotional Competence in children with autism. Diagnostic criteria and empirical evidence. Developmental Review, 28, 342–369.Google Scholar
  41. Begeer, S., Meerum Terwogt, M., Rieffe, C., Stegge, H., & Koot, J. M. (2007). Do children with autism acknowledge the influence of mood on behaviour? Autism, 11, 503–521.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  42. Begeer, S., Rieffe, C., Meerum Terwogt, M., & Stockmann, L. (2006). Attention to facial emotion expressions in children with autism. Autism, 10, 37–51.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  43. Behrmann, M., Thomas, C., & Humphreys, K. (2006). Seeing it differently: Visual processing in autism. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 10, 258–264.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  44. Ben Shalom, D., Mostofsky, S. H., Hazlett, R. L., Goldberg, M. C., Landa, R. J., Faran, Y., et al. (2006). Normal physiological emotions but differences in expression of conscious feelings in children with high-functioning autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36, 395–400.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  45. Bernier, R., Dawson, G., Panagiotides, H., & Webb, S. (2005). Individuals with autism spectrum disorder show normal responses to a fear potential startle paradigm. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 35, 575–583.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  46. Bieberich, A. A., & Morgan, S. B. (2004). Self-regulation and affective expression during play in children with autism or Down syndrome: A short-term longitudinal study. Journal of Autism and developmental Disorders, 34(4), 439–448.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  47. Bishop, D. V. M. (1993). Autism, executive functions and theory of mind – a neuropsychological perspective. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 34, 279–293.Google Scholar
  48. Blair, R. J. R. (1999). Psychophysiological responsiveness to the distress of others in children with autism. Personality and Individual Differences, 26, 477–485.Google Scholar
  49. Blake, R., Turner, L. M., Smoski, M. J., Pozdol, S. L., & Stone, W. L. (2003). Visual recognition of biological motion is impaired in children with autism. Psychological Science, 14, 151–157.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  50. Bolte, S., & Poustka, F. (2003). The recognition of facial affect in autistic and schizophrenic subjects and their first-degree relatives. Psychological Medicine, 33, 907–915.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  51. Bono, M. A., Daley, T., & Sigman, M. (2004). Relations among joint attention, amount of intervention, and language gain in autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 34, 495–505.Google Scholar
  52. Bormannkischkel, C., Vilsmeier, M., & Baude, B. (1995). The development of emotional concepts in autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 36, 1243–1259.Google Scholar
  53. Boucher, J., Lewis, V., & Collis, G. M. (2000). Voice processing abilities in children with autism, children with specific language impairments, and young typically developing children. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 41, 847–857.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  54. Bowler, D. M. (1992). “Theory of mind” in Asperger’s syndrome. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 33, 877–893.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  55. Braverman, M., Fein, D., Lucci, D., & Waterhouse, L. (1989). Affect comprehension in children with pervasive developmental disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 19, 301–316.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  56. Brim, D., Buffington Townsend, D., DeQuinzio, J. A., & Poulson, C. L. (2009). Analysis of social referencing skills among children with autism. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 3, 942–958.Google Scholar
  57. Broadhead, P. (2001). Investigating sociability and cooperation in four and five years olds in reception class settings. International Journal of Early Years Education, 9, 23–35.Google Scholar
  58. Bronson, M. B. (2000). Self regulation in early childhood. Nature and nurture. New York: Guildford Press.Google Scholar
  59. Brun, P. (2001a). La vie émotionnelle de l’enfant: Nouvelles perspectives et nouvelles questions. Enfance, 53, 221–225.Google Scholar
  60. Brun, P. (2001b). Psychopathologie de l’émotion chez l’enfant: L’importance des données développementales typiques. Enfance, 53, 281–291.Google Scholar
  61. Brun, P., & Nadel, J. (1998). La perception intermodale des émotions: Approche comparative développementale. L’Encéphale, 107–109.Google Scholar
  62. Brun, P., Nadel, J., & Mattlinger, M. J. (1998). L’hypothèse émotionnelle dans l’autisme. Psychologie Française, 43, 147–156.Google Scholar
  63. Brun, P., & Mellier, D. (2004). Régulation émotionnelle et retard mental: étude chez l’enfant trisomique 21. Handicap, 101–102, 19–31.Google Scholar
  64. Buffington, D. M., Krantz, P. J., McClannahan, L. E., & Poulson, C. L. (1998). Procedures for teaching appropriate gestural communication skills to children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 28, 535–545.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  65. Buitelaar, J. K., & van der Wees, M. (1997). Are deficits in the decoding of affective cues and in mentalizing abilities independent? Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 27, 539–556.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  66. Buitelaar, J. K., van der Wees, M., Swaab-Barneveld, H., & van der Gaag, R. J. (1999a). Theory of mind and emotion–recognition in autistic spectrum disorders and in psychiatric control and normal children. Development and Psychopathology, 11, 39–58.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  67. Buitelaar, J. K., van der Wees, M., Swaab-Barneveld, H., & van der Gaag, R. J. (1999b). Verbal memory and performance IQ predict theory of mind and emotion recognition ability in children with autistic spectrum disorders and in psychiatric control children. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 40, 869–881.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  68. Buron, K. D., & Curtis, M. (2004). The incredible 5-Point Scale: Assisting students with autism spectrum disorders in understanding social interactions and controlling their emotional responses. Shawnee Mission, KS: Autism Asperger Publishing Company.Google Scholar
  69. Campos, J. J., Campos, R. G., & Barret, K. C. (1989). Emergent themes in the study of emotional development and emotion regulation. Developmental Psychology, 25, 394–402.Google Scholar
  70. Capps, L., Kasari, C., Yirmiya, N., & Sigman, M. (1993). Parental perception of emotional expressiveness in children with autism. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 61, 475–484.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  71. Capps, L., Sigman, M., & Yirmiya, N. (1995). Self-competence and emotional understanding in High-Functioning children with autism. Development and Psychopathology, 7, 137–149.Google Scholar
  72. Capps, L., Yirmiya, N., & Sigman, M. (1992). Understanding of simple and complex emotions in non-retarded children with autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 33, 1169–1182.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  73. Cassidy, K. W., Ball, L. V., Rourke, M. T., Werner, R. S., Feeny, N., Chu, J. Y., et al. (1998). Theory of mind concepts in children’s literature. Applied Psycholinguistics, 19, 463–470.Google Scholar
  74. Castelli, F. (2005). Understanding emotions from standardized facial expressions in autism and normal development. Autism, 9, 428–449.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  75. Celani, G., Battacchi, M., & Arcidiacono, L. (1999). The understanding of emotional meaning of facial expressions in people with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 29, 57–66.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  76. Ceschi, G., & Scherer, K. R. (2001). Contrôler l’expression faciale et changer l’émotion: Une approche développementale. Enfance, 53, 257–269.Google Scholar
  77. Charlop-Christy, M. H., & Daneshvar, S. (2003). Using video modelling to teach perspective taking to children with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 5, 12–21.Google Scholar
  78. Charman, T., Swettenham, J., Baron-Cohen, S., Cox, A., Baird, G., & Drew, A. (1997). Infants with autism: An investigation on empathy, pretend play, joint attention, and imitation. Developmental Psychology, 33, 781–789.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  79. Charman, T., Swettenham, J., Baron-Cohen, S., Cox, A., Baird, G., & Drew, A. (1998). An experimental investigation of social cognitive abilities in infants with autism: Clinical implications. Infant Mental Health Journal, 19, 260–275.Google Scholar
  80. Chawarska, K., Klin, A., & Volkmar, F. (2003). Automatic attention cueing through eye movement in 2-year-old children with autism. Child Development, 74, 1108–1122.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  81. Cole, P. M. (1986). Children’s spontaneous control of facial expression. Child development, 57, 1309–1321.Google Scholar
  82. Cole, P. M., Martin, S. E., & Dennis, T. A. (2004). Emotion regulation as a scientific construct: Methodological challenges and directions for child development research. Child Development, 75, 317–333.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  83. Colvert, E., Custance, D., & Swettenham, J. (2002). Rule-based reasoning and theory of mind in autism: A commentary on the work of Zelazo, Jacques, Burack and Frye. Infant and Child Development, 11, 197–200.Google Scholar
  84. Constantino, J. N., & Gruber, C. P. (2005). Social responsiveness scale. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.Google Scholar
  85. Corbett, B. A., Constantine, L. J., Hendren, R., Rocke, D., & Ozonoff, S. (2009). Examining executive functioning in children with autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit, hyperactivity disorder and typical development. Psychiatry Research, 166, 210–222.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  86. Corona, R., Dissanayake, C., Arbelle, S., Wellington, P., & Sigman, M. (1998). Is affect aversive to young children with autism? Behavioral and cardiac responses to experimenter distress. Child Development, 69, 1494–1502.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  87. Cotugno, A. J. (2009). Social competences and Social skills training and intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39, 1268–1277.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  88. Critchley, H. D., Daly, E. M., Bullmore, E. T., Williams, S. C., Van Amelsvoort, T., Robertson, D. M., et al. (2000). The functional neuroanatomy of social behaviour: Changes in cerebral blood flow when people with autistic disorder process facial expressions. Brain, 123, 2203–2212.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  89. Cutting, A. L., & Dunn, J. (1999). Theory of mind, emotion understanding, language, and family background: Individual differences and interrelations. Child Development, 70, 853–865.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  90. Czapinski, P., & Bryson, S. E. (2003). Reduced facial muscle movements in autism: Evidence for dysfunction in the neuromuscular pathway? Brain and Cognition, 51, 177–179.Google Scholar
  91. Da Fonseca, D., Santos, A., Bastard-Rosset, D., Rondan, C., Poinso, F., & Deruelle, C. (2009). Can children with autistic spectrum disorders extract emotions out of contextual cues? Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 3, 50–56.Google Scholar
  92. Dahlgren, S. O., & Trillingsgaard, A. (1996). Theory of mind in non-retarded children with autism and Asperger’s syndrome: A research note. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 37, 759–763.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  93. Dapretto, M., Davies, M. S., Pfeifer, J. H., Scott, A. A., Sigman, M., Bookheimer, S. Y., et al. (2006). Understanding emotions in others: Mirror neuron dysfunction in children with autism spectrum disorders. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 9, 28–30.Google Scholar
  94. Davies, S., Bishop, D., Manstead, A. S., & Tantam, D. (1994). Face perception in children with autism and Asperger’s syndrome. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 35, 1033–1057.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  95. Dawson, G., & Adams, A. (1984). Imitation and social responsiveness in autistic children. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 12, 209–226.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  96. Dawson, G., Carver, L., Meltzoff, A. N., Panagiotides, H., McPartland, J., & Webb, S. J. (2002). Neural correlates of face and object recognition in young children with autism spectrum disorder, developmental delay, and typical development. Child Development, 73, 700–717.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  97. Dawson, G., & Galpert, L. (1990a). Mother’s use of imitative play for facilitating social responsiveness and toy play on autistic children. Development and Psychopathology, 2, 151–162.Google Scholar
  98. Dawson, G., Hill, D., Spencer, A., Galpert, L., & Watson, L. (1990b). Affective exchanges between young autistic children and their mothers. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 18, 335–345.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  99. Dawson, G., Webb, S. J., Carver, L., Panagiotides, H., & McPartland, J. (2004). Young children with autism show atypical brain responses to fearful versus neutral facial expressions of emotion. Developmental Science, 7, 340–359.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  100. Dawson, G., Webb, S. J., & McPartland, J. (2005). Understanding the nature of face processing impairment in autism: Insights from behavioral and electrophysiological studies. Developmental Neuropsychology, 27, 403–424.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  101. de Schonen, S., Mathivet, E., & Deruelle, C. (1989). Hemispheric specialization for face recognition in infancy. In C. von Euler, H. Forssberg, & H. Lagercrantz (Eds.), Neurobiology of early infant behavior (pp. 261–271). Houndmills: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  102. de Wit, T. C. J., Falck-Ytter, T., & von Hofsten, C. (2008). Young children with autism spectrum disorder look differently at positive versus negative emotional faces. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2, 651–659.Google Scholar
  103. Decety, J. (2002). Naturaliser l’empathie. L’Encéphale, 28, 9–20.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  104. Deneault, J., & Morin, P. (2007). La Théorie de l’Esprit: Ce que l’enfant comprend de l’univers psychologique. In S. Larivée (Ed.), L’intelligence. Tome 1. Les approches biocognitives, développementales et contemporaines (pp. 154–162). Montréal: ERPI.Google Scholar
  105. Denham, S. A. (1998). Emotional development in young children. New York: Guilford press.Google Scholar
  106. Denham, S. A., Blair, K. A., DeMulder, E., Levitas, J., Sawyer, K., Auerbach-Major, S., et al. (2003). Preschool emotional competence: Pathway to social competence? Child Development, 74, 238–256.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  107. Denham, S. A., & Couchoud, E. (1990). Young preschoolers’ understanding of emotion. Child Study Journal, 23, 171–192.Google Scholar
  108. Denham, S. A., Mason, T., Caverly, S., Schmidt, M., Hackney, R., Caswell, C., et al. (2001). Preschoolers at play: Co-socialisers of emotional and social competence. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 25, 290–301.Google Scholar
  109. Denham, S. A., McKinley, M., Couchoud, E. A., & Holt, R. (1990). Emotional and behavioural predictors of peer status in young preschoolers. Child Development, 61, 1145–1152.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  110. Dennis, T. A. (2006). Emotional self regulation in preschoolers: The interplay of temperamental approach reactivity and control processes. Developmental Psychology, 42, 84–97.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  111. Dennis, T. A., & Kelemen, D. A. (2009). Preschool children’s views on emotion regulation: Functional associations and implications for social–emotional adjustment. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 33, 243–252.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  112. Dennis, M., Lockyer, L., & Lazenby, A. L. (2000). How high-functioning children with autism understand real and deceptive emotion. Autism, 4, 370–381.Google Scholar
  113. Dennis, T. A., Malone, M., & Chen, C. (2009). Emotional face processing and emotion regulation in children: An ERP study. Developmental Neuropsychology, 34, 85–102.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  114. Dissanayake, C., Sigman, M., & Kasari, C. (1996). Long-term stability of individual differences in the emotional responsiveness of children with autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 37, 461–467.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  115. Dixon, D. R., Tarbox, J., & Najdowski, A. (2009). Social skills in autism spectrum disorders. In J. L. Matson (Ed.), Social behavior and skills in children (pp. 117–140). New York: Springer Sciences.Google Scholar
  116. Dodge, K. A., Pettit, G. S., McClaskey, C. L., & Brown, M. M. (1986). Social competence in children. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 51(2, Serial No. 213), 1–85.Google Scholar
  117. Doussard-Roosevelt, J. A., Joe, C. M., Bazhenova, O. V., & Porges, S. W. (2003). Mother–child interaction in autistic and nonautistic children: Characteristics of maternal approach behaviors and child social responses. Development and Psychopathology, 15, 277–295.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  118. Downs, A., & Smith, T. (2004). Emotion understanding, cooperation, and social behavior in high functioning autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 34, 625–635.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  119. Draghi-Lorenz, R., Reddy, V., & Costall, A. (2001). Rethinking the development of “nonbasic” emotions: A critical review of existing theories. Developmental Review, 21, 263–304.Google Scholar
  120. Dumas, C., & Lebeau, S. (1998). Le changement représentationnel affectif chez les enfants d’âge préscolaire. Revue canadienne de psychologie expérimentale, 52, 25–33.Google Scholar
  121. Dumont-Mathieu, T., & Fein, D. (2005). Screening for autism in young children: The modified checklist for autism in toddlers (M-CHAT) and other measures. Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews, 11, 253–262.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  122. Dunn, J. (1996). The Emanuel Miller Memorial Lecture 1995: Children’s relationships: Bridging the divide between cognitive and social development. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 37, 507–518.Google Scholar
  123. Dunn, W. (1999). The sensory profile manual. San Antonio, TX: The Psychological Corporation.Google Scholar
  124. Dunn, J. (2003). Emotional development in early childhood: A social relationship perspective. In R. Davidson, H. H. Goldsmith, & K. Scherer (Eds.), The handbook of affective science (pp. 332–346). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  125. Dyck, M. J., Ferguson, K., & Shochet, I. M. (2001). Do autism spectrum disorders differ from each other and from nonspectrum disorders on emption recognition tests? European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 10, 105–116.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  126. Dyer, J. R., Shatz, M., & Wellman, H. M. (2000). Young children’s storybooks as a source of mental state information. Cognitive Development, 15, 17–37.Google Scholar
  127. Eisenberg, N., & Fabes, R. A. (1992). Emotion, regulation, and the development of social competence. In M. S. Clark (Ed.), Emotion and social behavior (Vol. 14, pp. 119–150). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  128. Eisenberg, N., Fabes, R. A., Guthrie, I. K., & Reiser, M. (2000). Dispositional emotionality and regulation: Their role in predicting quality of social functioning. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78, 136–157.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  129. Eisenberg, N., Fabes, R. A., Murphy, B. C., Maszk, P., Smith, M., & Karbon, M. (1995). The role of emotionality and regulation in children’s social functioning: A longitudinal study. Child Development, 66, 1360–1384.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  130. Eisenberg, N., Fabes, R. A., Shepard, S. A., Murphy, B. C., Guthrie, I. K., Jones, S., et al. (1997a). Contemporaneous and longitudinal prediction of children’s social functioning from regulation and emotionality. Child Development, 68, 642–664.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  131. Eisenberg, N., Guthrie, I. K., Fabes, R. A., Reiser, M., Murphy, B. C., Holgren, R., et al. (1997b). The relations of regulation and emotionality to resiliency and competent social functioning in elementary school children. Child Development, 68, 295–311.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  132. Eisenberg, N., Hofer, C., & Vaughan, J. (2007). Effortful control and its socio-emotional consequences. In J. J. Gross (Ed.), Handbook emotion regulation (pp. 287–306). New York: The Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  133. Eisenberg, N., & Spinrad, T. L. (2004). Emotion-related: Sharpening the definition. Child development, 75, 331–339.Google Scholar
  134. Eisenberg, N., Zhou, Q., Liew, J. C., Pidada, S., & Champion, C. (2006). Emotion, emotion-related regulation, and social functioning. In X. Chen, D. French, & B. Schneider (Eds.), Peer relationships in cultural context (pp. 170–200). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  135. Eisenmajer, R., & Prior, M. (1991). Cognitive linguistic correlates of “theory of mind” ability in autistic children. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 9, 351–364.Google Scholar
  136. Ekman, P. (1992). Are there basic emotions? Psychological Review, 99, 550–553.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  137. Ekman, P., & Friesen, W. V. (1975). Unmasking the face. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
  138. Ekman, P., & Friesen, W. V. (1977). Manual for the facial action coding system. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.Google Scholar
  139. Ekman, P., & Friesen, W. V. (1978). The facial action coding system. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.Google Scholar
  140. Emery, N. J. (2005). The evolution of social cognition. In A. Easton & N. J. Emery (Eds.), The cognitive neuroscience of social behaviour (pp. 115–156). New York: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
  141. Fabes, R. A., Eisenberg, N., Jones, S., Smith, M., Guthrie, I., Poulin, R., et al. (1999). Regulation, emotionality, and preschoolers’ socially competent peer interactions. Child Development, 70, 432–442.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  142. Fein, D., Lucci, D., Braverman, M., & Waterhouse, L. (1992). Comprehension of affect in context in children with pervasive developmental disorders. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 33, 1157–1167.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  143. Feinman, S. (1982). Social referencing in infancy. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 28, 445–470.Google Scholar
  144. Feinman, S., Roberts, D., Hsieh, K., Sawyer, D., & Swanson, D. (1992). A critical review of social referencing in infancy. In S. Feinman (Ed.), Social referencing and the social construction of reality in infancy (pp. 15–54). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  145. Feng, H., Lo, Y., & Tsai, S. (2008). The effects of theory of mind and social skills training on the social competence in a sixth-grade student with autism. Journal of Positive Behaviour Interventions, 10, 228–242.Google Scholar
  146. Field, T., Field, T., Sanders, C., & Nadel, J. (2001). Children with autism display more social behaviors after repeated imitation sessions. Autism, 5, 317–323.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  147. Field, T. M., & Walden, T. A. (1982). Production and discrimination of facial expressions by preschool children. Child Development, 53, 1299–1300.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  148. Fisher, N., & Happé, F. (2006). A training study of theory of mind and executive function in children with autistic spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 35, 757–771.Google Scholar
  149. Flavell, J. H. (1999). Cognitive development: Children’s knowledge about the mind. Annual Review of Psychology, 50, 21–45.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  150. Fletcher, P. C., Happé, F., Frith, U., Baker, S. C., Dolan, R. J., Frack-owiak, R. S. J., et al. (1995). Other minds in the brain: A functional imaging study of ‘theory of mind’ in story comprehension. Cognition, 57, 109–128.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  151. Frith, U. (2001). Mind blindness and the brain in autism. Neuron, 32, 969–979.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  152. Frith, U. (2003). Autism: Explaining the enigma (2nd ed.). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  153. Frith, U. (2004). Emanuel Miller lecture: Confusions and controversies about Asperger syndrome. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 45, 672–686.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  154. Frith, U., & Happé, F. (1994). Autism: ‘Beyond theory of mind’. Cognition, 50, 115–132.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  155. Frye, D., Zelazo, P. D., & Palfai, T. (1995). Theory of mind and rule-based reasoning. Cognitive Development, 10, 483–527.Google Scholar
  156. Gallagher, H. L., & Frith, C. (2003). Functional imaging of ‘theory of mind’. Trends in Cognitive Neurosciences, 7, 77–83.Google Scholar
  157. Gallese, V., & Goldman, A. (1998). Mirror-neurons and the simulation theory of mind-reading. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 2, 493–501.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  158. Garitte, C. (2003). La reconnaissance des expressions faciales chez des enfants de 8 ans d’âge réel et/ou mental: Processus cognitifs ou sociaux? Approche Neuropsychologique des Apprentissages chez l’Enfant, 71, 48–52.Google Scholar
  159. Gattegno, M. P., Ionescu, S., Malvy, J., & Adrien, J. L. (1999). Etude préliminaire de la recherche d’un lien spécifique entre les troubles de l’attention conjointe et de la Théorie de l’Esprit dans l’autisme de l’enfant. Approche Neuropsychologique des Apprentissages chez l’Enfant, 52, 42–48.Google Scholar
  160. Gena, A., Krantz, P. J., McClannahan, L. E., & Poulson, C. L. (1996). Training and generalization of affective behaviour displayed by youth with autism. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 29, 291–304.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  161. Gepner, B., de Schonen, S., & Buttin, C. (1994). Face processing in young autistic children. Infant Behavior and Development, 17, 661.Google Scholar
  162. Gepner, B., Deruelle, C., & Grynfeltt, S. (2004). Motion and emotion: A novel approach to the study of face processing by young autistic children. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 31, 37–45.Google Scholar
  163. Gervais, H., Belin, P., Boddaert, N., Leboyer, M., Coez, A., Sfaello, I., et al. (2004). Abnormal cortical voice processing in autism. Nature Neuroscience, 7, 801–802.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  164. Gevers, C., Clifford, P., Mager, M., & Boer, F. (2006). Brief report: A theory of mind based social cognition training program for school-aged children with pervasive developmental disorders: An open study of its effectiveness. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36, 567–571.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  165. Gewirtz, J. L., & Pelaez-Nogueres, M. (1992). Social referencing as a learned process. In S. Feinman (Ed.), Social referencing and the social construction of reality in infancy. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  166. Gilbert, P. (2004). Evolution, attractiveness, and the emergence of shame and guilt in a self-aware mind: A reflection on Tracy and Robins. Psychological Inquiry, 15, 132–135.Google Scholar
  167. Golan, O., & Baron-Cohen, S. (2006b). Systemizing empathy: Teaching adults with Asperger syndrome or high functioning autism to recognize complex emotions using interactive multimedia. Development and Psychopathology, 18, 589–615.Google Scholar
  168. Golan, O., Baron-Cohen, S., & Hill, J. (2006a). The Cambridge mindreading (CAM) face-voice battery: Testing complex emotion recognition in adults with and without Asperger syndrome. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36, 169–183.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  169. Gordon, R. M. (1992). The simulation theory: Objections and misconceptions. Mind and Language, 7, 11–34.Google Scholar
  170. Gosselin, P. (1995). Le développement de la reconnaissance des expressions faciales des émotions chez l’enfant. Revue Canadienne des Sciences du Comportement, 27, 107–119.Google Scholar
  171. Gosselin, P. (2005). Le décodage de l’expression faciale des émotions au cours de l’enfance. Psychologie Canadienne, 46, 126–138.Google Scholar
  172. Gottman, J. M. (1986). The world of coordinated-play: Same and cross-sex friendship in young children. In J. M. Gottman & J. G. Parker (Eds.), Conversations of friends: Speculations on affective development (pp. 139–191). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  173. Grandin, T. (1995). Thinking in pictures. New York: Vintage Books.Google Scholar
  174. Gray, C. (1994). Comic strip conversations: Colorful illustrated interactions with students with autism and related disorders. Jenison, MI: Jenison Public Schools.Google Scholar
  175. Gray, C. (2004). Social stories 10.0. Jenison, MI: Jenison Public Schools.Google Scholar
  176. Gray, C., & Garand, J. D. (1993). Social stories: Improving responses of students with autism with accurate social information. Focus on Autistic Behaviour, 8, 1–10.Google Scholar
  177. Gresham, F. M., & Elliott, S. N. (1990). The social skills rating system. Circle Pines, MN: American Guidance Services.Google Scholar
  178. Gross, J. (1998). The emerging field of emotion regulation: An integrative review. Review of General Psychology, 2(3), 271–299.Google Scholar
  179. Gross, T. F. (2004). The perception of four basic emotions in human and nonhuman faces by children with autism and other developmental disabilities. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 32, 469–480.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  180. Gross, T. F. (2005). Global-local precedence in the perception of facial age and emotional expression by children with autism and other developmental disabilities. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 35, 773–785.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  181. Gross, J. J., & Thompson, R. A. (2007). Emotion regulation: Conceptual foundations. In J. J. Gross (Ed.), Handbook of emotion regulation (pp. 3–24). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  182. Grossman, J. B., Klin, A., Carter, A. S., & Volkmar, F. R. (2000). Verbal bias in recognition of facial emotions in children with Asperger syndrome. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 41, 369–379.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  183. Grossman, R. B., & Tager-Flusberg, H. (2008). Reading faces for information about words and emotions in adolescents with autism. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2, 681–695.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  184. Gutstein, S. E. (2000). Solving the relationship puzzle. Arlington, TX: Future Horizons.Google Scholar
  185. Hadwin, J., Baron-Cohen, S., Howlin, P., & Hill, K. (1996). Can we teach children with autism to understand emotions, beliefs, or pretence? Development and Psychopathology, 8, 345–365.Google Scholar
  186. Hadwin, J., Baron-Cohen, S., Howlin, P., & Hill, K. (1997). Does teaching theory of mind have an effect on the ability to develop conversation in children with autism? Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 27, 519–537.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  187. Halberstadt, A. G., Denham, S. A., & Dunsmore, J. C. (2001). Affective social competence. Social Development, 10, 79–119.Google Scholar
  188. Hale, C. M., & Tager-Flusberg, H. (2005). Brief report: The relationship between discourse deficits and autism symptomatology. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 35, 519–524.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  189. Happé, F. (1995). The role of age and verbal ability in the theory of mind task performance of subjects with autism. Child Development, 66, 843–855.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  190. Happé, F. (1999). Autism: Cognitive deficit or cognitive style? Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 3, 216–222.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  191. Happé, F. (2000). Parts and wholes, meanings and minds: Central coherence and its relation to theory of mind. In S. Baron-Cohen, H. Tager-Flusberg, & D. Cohen (Eds.), Understanding other minds, perspectives from autism and development neuroscience (2nd ed., pp. 203–221). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  192. Happé, F., Ronald, A., & Plomin, R. (2006). Time to give up on a single explanation for autism. Nature Neuroscience, 9, 1218–1220.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  193. Harris, P. L. (2000). The work of the imagination. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  194. Harris, P. L., Brown, E., Marriott, C., Whittall, S., & Harmer, S. (1991). Monsters, ghosts and witches – testing the limits of the fantasy reality distinction in young-children. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 9, 105–123.Google Scholar
  195. Harris, P. L., Johnson, C. N., Hutton, D., Andrews, B., & Cooke, T. (1989). Young children’s theory of mind and emotion. Cognition and Emotion, 3, 379–400.Google Scholar
  196. Hartup, W. W. (1983). Peer relations. In P. Mussen & E. M. Hetherington (Eds.), Handbook of child psychology, Vol. 4. Socialization, personality, and social development (4th ed., pp. 103–196). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  197. Haxby, J. V., Hoffman, E. A., & Gobbini, M. I. (2000). The distributed neural system for face perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 4, 223–233.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  198. Haynie, D. L., & Lamb, M. E. (1995). Positive and negative facial expressiveness in 7-, 10-, 13-month-old infants. Infant behaviour and Development, 18(2), 257–259.Google Scholar
  199. Heerey, E. A., Keltner, D., & Capps, L. M. (2003). Making sense of self-conscious emotion: Linking theory of mind and emotion in children with autism. Emotion, 3, 394–400.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  200. Heimann, M. (1998). Imitation in neonates, in older infants and in children with autism: Feedback to theory. In S. Bräten (Ed.), Intersubjective communication and emotion in early ontogeny (pp. 47–62). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  201. Herbé, D., Tremblay, H., & Mallet, P. (2007). La coopération dyadique entre enfants de 5-6 ans: Effets de la complexité cognitive et de l’activité motrice sollicitées par les situations de résolution de problème. Enfance, 59, 393–413.Google Scholar
  202. Hill, E., Berthoz, S., & Frith, U. (2004). Brief report: Cognitive processing of own emotions in individuals with autistic spectrum disorder and in their relatives. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 34, 229–235.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  203. Hillier, A., & Allinson, L. (2002). Understanding embarrassment among those with autism: Breaking down the complex emotion of embarrassment among those with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 32, 583–592.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  204. Hilton, C., Graver, K., & LaVesser, P. (2007). Relationship between social competence and sensory processing in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 1, 164–173.Google Scholar
  205. Hippolyte, L., Barisnikov, K., Van der Linden, M., & Detraux, J. J. (2009). From facial emotional recognition abilities to emotional attribution: A study in Down syndrome. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 30, 1007–1022.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  206. Hobson, R. P. (1986a). The autistic child’s appraisal of expressions of emotion. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 27, 321–342.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  207. Hobson, R. P. (1986b). The autistic child’s appraisal of expressions of emotion: A further study. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 27, 671–680.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  208. Hobson, R. P. (1989). Beyond cognition: A theory of autism. In G. Dawson (Ed.), Autism: New perspectives on diagnosis, nature and treatment (pp. 22–48). Guilford: New York.Google Scholar
  209. Hobson, R. P. (1991). Methodological issues for experiments on autistic individuals’ perception and understanding of emotion. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 32, 1135–1158.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  210. Hobson, R. P. (1993). Autism and the development of mind. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  211. Hobson, R. P., & Lee, A. (1998). Hello and goodbye: A study of social engagement in autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 28, 117–127.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  212. Hobson, R. P., Ouston, J., & Lee, A. (1988). Emotion recognition in autism: Co-ordinating faces and voices. Psychological Medicine, 18, 911–923.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  213. Hobson, R. P., Ouston, J., & Lee, A. (1989). Naming emotion in faces and voices: Abilities and disabilities in autism and mental retardation. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 7, 237–250.Google Scholar
  214. Howlin, P., Baron-Cohen, S., & Hadwin, J. (1999). Teaching children with autism to mind-read: A practical guide. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  215. Hudry, K., & Slaughter, V. (2009). Agent familiarity and emotional context influence the everyday empathic responding of young children with autism. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 3, 74–85.Google Scholar
  216. Huebner, R. A., & Dunn, W. (2001). Introduction and basic concepts. In R. Huebner (Ed.), Autism: A sensorimotor approach to management (pp. 61–99). Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen.Google Scholar
  217. Hugues, C., Soares-Boucaud, I., Hochman, J., & Frith, U. (1997). Social behaviour in pervasive developmental disorders: Effects of informants group and “theory of mind”. European Child and Adolescents Psychiatry, 6, 191–198.Google Scholar
  218. Hwang, B., & Hughes, C. (2000). Increasing early social-communicative skills of preverbal preschool children with autism through social interactive training. Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 25, 18–28.Google Scholar
  219. Iacobani, M., & Dapretto, M. (2006). The mirror neuron system and the consequences of its dysfunction. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 7, 942–951.Google Scholar
  220. Izard, C. E., & Malatesta, C. Z. (1987). Perspectives on emotional development I: Differential emotions theory of early emotional development. In J. D. Osofsky (Ed.), Handbook of infant development (pp. 494–554). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  221. Jaedicke, S., Storoschuk, S., & Lord, C. (1994). Subjective experience and causes of affect in high-functioning children and adolescents with autism. Development and Psychopathology, 6, 273–284.Google Scholar
  222. Jemel, B., Mottron, L., & Dawson, M. (2006). Impaired face processing in autism: Fact or artifact? Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36, 91–106.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  223. Jones, E. A. (2009). Establishing response and stimulus classes for initiating joint attention in children with autism. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 3, 375–389.Google Scholar
  224. Jones, E. A., & Carr, E. G. (2004). Joint attention and autism: Theory and intervention. Focus on Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 19, 13–26.Google Scholar
  225. Jones, E. A., Carr, E. G., & Feeley, K. M. (2006). Multiple effects of joint attention intervention for children with autism. Behavior Modification, 30, 782–834.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  226. Jones, E. A., & Feeley, K. M. (2007). Parent implemented joint attention intervention for preschoolers with autism. Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Applied Behavior Analysis, 2, 252–268.Google Scholar
  227. Joseph, R. M., Tager-Flusberg, H., & Lord, C. (2002). Cognitive profiles and social–communicative functioning in children with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 43(6), 807–821.Google Scholar
  228. Joseph, R. M., & Tanaka, J. (2003). Holistic and part-based face recognition in children with autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 44, 529–542.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  229. Josephs, I. E. (1994). Display rule behavior and understanding in preschool children. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 18, 301–326.Google Scholar
  230. Kahana-Kalman, R., & Goldman, S. (2008). Intermodal matching of emotional expressions in young children with autism. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2, 301–310.Google Scholar
  231. Kamio, Y., Wolf, J., & Fein, D. (2006). Automatic processing of emotional faces in high-functioning pervasive developmental disorders: An affective priming study. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36, 155–167.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  232. Karmiloff-Smith, A., Klima, E., Bellugi, U., Grant, J., & Baron-Cohen, S. (1995). Is there a social module? Language, face processing and theory of mind in individuals with Williams Syndrome. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 7, 196–208.Google Scholar
  233. Kasari, C., Chamberlain, B., & Bauminger, N. (2001a). In J. Burack, T. Charman, N. Yirmiya, & P. Zelazo (Eds.), The development of autism: Perspectives from theory and research (pp. 309–325). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  234. Kasari, C., Freeman, S. F. N., & Paparella, T. (2001b). Early intervention in autism: Joint attention and symbolic play. In L. M. Glidden (Ed.), International review of research in mental retardation. Autism (Vol. 23, pp. 207–237). San Diego, CA: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  235. Kasari, C., Freeman, S. F. N., & Paparella, T. (2006). Joint attention and symbolic play in young children with autism: A randomized controlled intervention study. Journal of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry, 47, 611–620.Google Scholar
  236. Kasari, C., & Sigman, M. (1996). Expression and understanding of emotion in atypical development: Autism and Down syndrome. In M. Lewis & M. W. Sullivan (Eds.), Emotional development in atypical children (pp. 109–130). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  237. Kasari, C., Sigman, M. D., Baumgartner, P., & Stipek, D. J. (1993b). Pride and mastery in children with autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 34, 353–362.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  238. Kasari, C., Sigman, M., Mundy, P., & Yirmiya, N. (1990). Affective sharing in the context of joint attention interactions of normal, autistic, and mentally retarded children. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 20, 87–100.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  239. Kasari, C., Sigman, M., & Yirmiya, N. (1993a). Focused and social attention of autistic-children in interactions with familiar and unfamiliar adults – A comparison of autistic, mentally-retarded, and normal-children. Development and Psychopathology, 5, 403–414.Google Scholar
  240. Kieras, J. E., Tobin, R. M., Graziano, W. G., & Rothbart, M. K. (2005). You can’t always get what you want effortful control and children’s responses to undesirable gifts. Psychological Science, 16, 391–396.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  241. Klin, A. (2000). Attributing social meaning to ambiguous visual stimuli in higher-functioning autism and Asperger syndrome: The social attribution task. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 41, 831–846.Google Scholar
  242. Klin, A., & Jones, W. (2008). Altered face scanning and impaired recognition of biological motion in a 15-month-old infant with autism. Developmental Science, 11, 40–46.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  243. Klin, A., Jones, W., Schultz, R., & Volkmar, F. (2003). The enactive mind, or from actions to cognition: Lessons from autism. Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London series B-Biological Sciences, 358, 345–360.Google Scholar
  244. Klin, A., Jones, W., Schultz, R., Volkmar, F., & Cohen, D. (2002a). Defining and quantifying the social phenotype in autism. American Journal of Psychiatry, 159, 895–908.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  245. Klin, A., Jones, W., Schultz, R., Volkmar, F. R., & Cohen, D. J. (2002b). Visual fixation patterns during viewing of naturalistic social situations as predictors of social competence in individuals with autism. Archives of General Psychiatry, 59, 809–816.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  246. Kloo, D., & Perner, J. (2003). Training transfer between card sorting and false belief understanding: Helping children apply conflicting descriptions. Child Development, 74, 1823–1839.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  247. Koning, C., & Magill-Evans, J. (2001). Social and language skills in adolescent boys with Asperger syndrome. Autism, 5, 23–36.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  248. Konstantareas, M. M., & Stewart, K. (2006). Affect regulation and temperament in children with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36, 143–154.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  249. Kusché, C. A., & Greenberg, M. T. (1994). The PATHS curriculum. Seattle, WA: Developmental Research and Programs, Inc.Google Scholar
  250. Kylliainen, A., & Hietanen, J. K. (2006). Skin conductance responses to another person’s gaze in children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36, 517–525.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  251. LaBounty, J., Wellman, H. M., & Olson, S. (2008). Mother’s and father’s use of internal state talk with their young children. Social Development, 17, 757–775.Google Scholar
  252. Lagattuta, K. H. (2005). When you shouldn’t do what you want to do: Young children’s understanding of desires, rules, and emotions. Child Development, 76, 713–733.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  253. Lahaie, A., Mottron, L., Arguin, M., Berthiaume, C., Jemel, B., & Saumier, D. (2006). Face perception in high-functioning autistic adults: Evidence for superior processing of face parts, not for a configural face processing deficit. Neuropsychology, 20, 30–41.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  254. Langdell, T. (1978). Recognition of faces: An approach to the study of autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 19, 225–268.Google Scholar
  255. Le Sourn-Bissaoui, S., Caillies, S., Gierski, F., & Motte, J. (2009). Inference processing in adolescents with Asperger syndrome: Relationship with theory of mind abilities. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 3, 797–808.Google Scholar
  256. LeBlanc, L. A., Coates, A. M., Daneshvar, S., Charlop-Christy, M. H., Morris, C., & Lancaster, B. M. (2003). Using video modelling and reinforcement to teach perspective-taking skills to children with autism. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 36, 253–257.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  257. Leppänen, J. M., & Hietanen, J. K. (2001). Emotion recognition and social adjustment in school-aged girls and boys. Psychology in the Schools, 42, 405–417.Google Scholar
  258. Leslie, A. M. (1987). Pretence and representation: The origins of ‘theory of mind’. Psychological Review, 94, 412–426.Google Scholar
  259. Leslie, A. M. (1991). Theory of mind impairment in autism. In A. Whiten (Ed.), The emergence of mindreading: The evolution development, and simulation or second-order mental representation (pp. 63–78). Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  260. Leslie, A. M. (2000). How to acquire a ‘representational theory of mind’. In D. Sperber (Ed.), Metarepresentation: A multidisciplinary perspective (pp. 197–223). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  261. Leslie, A. M., & Roth, D. (2000). What autism teaches us about representation. In S. Baron-Cohen, H. Tager-Flusberg, & D. J. Cohen (Eds.), Understanding other minds: Perspectives for autism (pp. 83–111). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  262. Leslie, A. M., & Thaiss, L. (1992). Domain specificity in conceptual development: Evidence from autism. Cognition, 43, 225–251.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  263. Lewis, M., & Sullivan, M. W. (1996). Emotional development in atypical children. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  264. Lewis, M., Sullivan, M. W., Stanger, C., & Weiss, M. (1989). Self development and self-conscious emotions. Child development, 60, 146–156.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  265. Lindner, J. L., & Rosen, L. A. (2006). Decoding of emotion through facial expression, prosody and verbal content in children and adolescents with Asperger’s syndrome. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36, 769–777.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  266. Losh, M., & Capps, L. (2006). Understanding of emotional experience in autism: Insights from the personal accounts of high-functioning children with autism. Developmental Psychology, 42, 809–818.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  267. Loveland, K. A., & Landry, S. H. (1986). Joint attention and language in autism and developmental language delay. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 16, 335–349.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  268. Loveland, K. A., & Tunali, B. (1991). Social scripts for conversational interactions in autism and Down syndrome. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 21, 177–186.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  269. Loveland, K. A., Tunali-Kotoski, B., Chen, R., Brelsford, K. A., Ortegon, J., & Pearson, D. A. (1995). Intermodal perception of affect in persons with autism or Down syndrome. Development and Psychopathology, 7, 409–418.Google Scholar
  270. Loveland, K. A., Tunali-kotoski, B., Pearson, D. A., Brelsford, K. A., Ortegon, J., & Chen, R. (1994). Imitation and expression of facial affect in autism. Development and Psychopathology, 6, 433–444.Google Scholar
  271. Luminet, O. (2002). Psychologie des émotions. Bruxelles: De Boeck.Google Scholar
  272. Luminet, O., & Lenoir, V. (2006). Alexithymie parentale et capacités émotionnelles des enfants de 3 et 5 ans. Enfance, 4, 335–356.Google Scholar
  273. MacDonald, H., Rutter, M., Howlin, P., Rios, P., Le Conteur, A., Evered, C., et al. (1989). Recognition and expression of emotional cues by autistic and normal adults. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 30, 865–877.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  274. Maestro, S., Muratori, F., Cavallaro, M. C., Pei, F., Stern, D., Golse, B., et al. (2002). Attentional skills during the first 6 months of age in autism spectrum disorder. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 41, 1239–1245.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  275. Malatesta, C. Z., & Haviland, J. M. (1982). Learning display rules – the socialization of emotion expression in infancy. Child Development, 53, 991–1003.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  276. Malatesta-Magai, C., Leak, S., Tesman, J., & Shepard, B. (1994). Profiles of emotional development: Individual differences in facial and vocal expression of emotion during the second and third years of life. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 17, 239–269.Google Scholar
  277. Mann, T. A., & Walker, P. (2003). Autism and a deficit in broadening the spread of visual attention. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 44(2), 274–284.Google Scholar
  278. Matson, J. L., Rotatori, A. F., & Helsel, W. J. (1983). Development of a rating scale to measure social skills in children: The Matson evaluation of social skills with youngsters (MESSY). Behaviour Research and Therapy, 21, 335–340.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  279. McAfee, J. (2001). Navigating the social world: A curriculum for educating individuals with Asperger’s syndrome and high-functioning autism. Arlington, TX: Future Horizons, Inc.Google Scholar
  280. McGovern, C. W., & Sigman, M. (2005). Continuity and change from early childhood to adolescence in autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 46, 401–408.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  281. McGregor, E., Whiten, A., & Blackburn, P. (1998). Teaching Theory of Mind by highlighting intention and illustrating thoughts: A comparison of their effectiveness with three-year-olds and autistic subjects. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 16, 281–300.Google Scholar
  282. Meltzoff, A. (1999). Origins of theory of mind, cognition and communication. Journal of Communication Disorders, 32, 251–269.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  283. Meltzoff, A., & Gopnik, A. (1993). The role of imitation in understanding persons and developing a theory of mind. In S. Baron-Cohen, H. Tager-Flusberg, & D. Cohen (Eds.), Understanding other minds: Perspectives from Autism (pp. 335–366). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  284. Mikolajczak, M., Quoidbach, J., Kotsou, I., & Nélis, D. (2009). Les compétences émotionnelles. Paris: Dunod.Google Scholar
  285. Mills, R. S. L. (2005). Taking stock of the developmental literature on shame. Developmental Review, 25, 26–63.Google Scholar
  286. Mitchell, P. (1996). Acquiring a conception of mind: A review of psychological research and theory. Hove: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
  287. Mottron, L. (2004). L’autisme: Une autre intelligence. Liège: Mardaga.Google Scholar
  288. Mottron, L., & Burack, J. (2001). Enhanced perceptual functioning in the development of autism. In J. Burack, T. Charman, N. Yirmiya, & P. D. Zelazo (Eds.), The development of autism: Perspectives from theory and research (pp. 131–148). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  289. Mottron, L., Dawson, M., Soulieres, I., Hubert, B., & Burack, J. (2006). Enhanced perceptual functioning in autism: An update, and eight principles of autistic perception. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36, 27–43.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  290. Mundy, P., & Crowson, M. (1997). Joint attention and early social communication: Implications for research on intervention with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorder, 27, 653–676.Google Scholar
  291. Mundy, P., & Gomes, A. (1998). Individual differences in joint attention skill development in the second year. Infant Behavior and Development, 21, 469–482.Google Scholar
  292. Mundy, P., Sigman, M., & Kasari, C. (1990). A longitudinal study of joint attention and language development in autistic children. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 20, 115–128.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  293. Nadel, J. (1998a). L’imitation: Son déficit est-il démontré chez l’enfant autiste? L’Encéphale, 128–129.Google Scholar
  294. Nadel, J. (1998b). Les habits neufs de l’âge mental. Enfance, 1, 111–117.Google Scholar
  295. Nadel, J., Croué, S., Mattlinger, M. J., Canet, P., Hudelot, C., Lécuyer, C., et al. (2000). Do children with autism have expectancies about social behaviour of unfamiliar people? Autism, 4, 133–145.Google Scholar
  296. Nadel, J., & Pezé, A. (1993). What makes immediate imitation communicative in toddlers and autistic children. In J. Nadel & L. Camaioni (Eds.), New perspectives in early communicative development (pp. 139–156). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  297. Nader-Grosbois, N. (2007a). L’autorégulation et la dysrégulation chez des jeunes enfants à autisme en situation d’évaluation développementale. Revue Francophone de la Déficience Intellectuelle, 17, 34–52.Google Scholar
  298. Nader-Grosbois, N. (2007b). Comment la dysrégulation chez de jeunes enfants autistes et à déficience intellectuelle se manifeste-t-elle en situation d’évaluation développementale? In N. Nader-Grosbois (Ed.), Régulation, autorégulation et dysrégulation (pp. 83–100). Wavre: Mardaga.Google Scholar
  299. Nader-Grosbois, N. (2009). Resilience, regulation and quality of life. Louvain-la-Neuve: Presses Universitaires de Louvain.Google Scholar
  300. Nader-Grosbois, N. (2011). Théorie de l’esprit: Entre cognition, émotion et adaptation sociale: chez des personnes typiques et atypiques. Bruxelles: De Boeck.Google Scholar
  301. Nelson, C. A. (1987). The recognition of facial expressions in the first two years of life: Mechanisms of development. Child Development, 58, 889–909.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  302. Noens, I. L. J., & van Berckelaer-Onnes, I. A. (2008). The central coherence account of autism revisited: Evidence from the ComFor study. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2, 209–222.Google Scholar
  303. Oberman, L. M., Hubbard, E. M., McCleery, J. P., Altschuler, E. L., Ramachandran, V. S., & Pineda, J. A. (2005). EEG evidence for mirror neuron dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders. Cognitive Brain Research, 24, 190–198.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  304. Ontai, L. L., & Thompson, R. A. (2002). Patterns of attachment and maternal discourse effects on children’s emotion understanding from 3 to 5 years of age. Social Development, 11(4), 433–450.Google Scholar
  305. Oster, H. (2003). Emotion in the infant’s face – insights from the study of infants with facial anomalies. Annals of the New York Academy of Science, 1000, 197–204.Google Scholar
  306. Osterling, J. A., Dawson, G., & Munson, J. A. (2002). Early recognition of 1-year-old infants with autism spectrum disorder versus mental retardation. Development and Psychopathology, 14, 239–251.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  307. Ozonoff, S., & Miller, J. (1995). Teaching theory of mind: A new approach to social skills training for individuals with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 25(4), 415–433.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  308. Ozonoff, S., Pennington, B. F., & Rogers, S. J. (1990). Are there emotion perception deficits in young autistic children? Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 31, 343–361.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  309. Ozonoff, S., Pennington, B. F., & Rogers, S. J. (1991). Executive function deficits in high functioning autistic children: Relationship to Theory of Mind. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 32, 1081–1105.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  310. Palomo, R., Belinchon, M., & Ozonoff, S. (2006). Autism and family home movies: A comprehensive review. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 27, 59–68.Google Scholar
  311. Paris, B. (2000). Characteristics of autism. In C. Murray-Slutsky & B. Paris (Eds.), Exploring the spectrum of autism and pervasive developmental disorders (pp. 7–23). Therapy Builder: Harcourt Health Sciences Co.Google Scholar
  312. Parker, J. G., & Asher, S. R. (1987). Peer relations and later personal adjustment: Are low-accepted children at risk? Psychological Bulletin, 102(3), 357–389.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  313. Parron, C., Da Fonseca, D., Santos, A., Moore, D. G., Monfardini, E., & Deruelle, C. (2008). Recognition of biological motion in children with autistic spectrum disorders. Autism, 12, 261–274.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  314. Parsons, S., & Mitchell, P. (1999). What children with autism understand about thoughts and thought-bubbles. Autism, 3, 17–38.Google Scholar
  315. Pellicano, E. (2007). Links between theory of mind and executive function in young children with autism: Clues to developmental primacy. Development Psychology, 43, 974–990.Google Scholar
  316. Pellicano, E., Maybery, M., Durkin, K., & Maley, A. (2006). Multiple cognitive capabilities/deficits in children with an autism spectrum disorder: “Weak” central coherence and its relationship to theory of mind and executive control. Development and Psychopathology, 18, 77–98.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  317. Pelphrey, K. A., Sasson, N. J., Reznick, J. S., Paul, G., Goldman, B. D., & Piven, J. (2002). Visual scanning of faces in autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 32, 249–261.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  318. Perner, J., Frith, U., Leslie, A. M., & Leekam, S. (1989). Exploration of the autistic child’s theory of mind: Knowledge, belief, and communication. Child Development, 60, 689–700.Google Scholar
  319. Perner, J., Lang, B., & Kloo, D. (2002). Theory of mind and self-control: More than a common problem of inhibition. Child Development, 73, 752–767.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  320. Perra, O., Williams, J. H. G., Whiten, A., Fraser, L., Benzie, H., & Perrett, D. I. (2008). Imitation and ‘theory of mind’ competencies in discrimination of autism from other neurodevelopmental disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2, 456–468.Google Scholar
  321. Perron, M., & Gosselin, P. (2004). Le développement de la simulation des émotions: Une étude de la vraisemblance des expressions faciales produites par les enfants. Enfance, 2, 109–125.Google Scholar
  322. Peterson, C. C., & Slaughter, V. (2003). Opening windows into the mind: Mothers’ preferences for mental state explanations and children’s theory of mind. Cognitive Development, 18, 399–429.Google Scholar
  323. Peterson, C. C., & Slaughter, V. (2009). Theory of mind (ToM) in children with autism or typical development: Links between eye-reading and false belief understanding. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 3, 462–473.Google Scholar
  324. Peterson, C. C., Wellman, H. M., & Liu, D. (2005). Steps in theory-of-mind development for children with deafness or autism. Child Development, 76, 502–517.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  325. Philippot, P. (2007). Emotions et Psychothérapies. Wavre: Mardaga.Google Scholar
  326. Phillips, W., Baron-Cohen, S., & Rutter, M. (1992). The role of eye contact in goal detection: Evidence from normal infants and children with autism or mental handicap. Development and Psychopathology, 4, 375–383.Google Scholar
  327. Piggot, J., Kwon, H., Mobbs, D., Blasey, C., Lotspeich, L., Menon, V., et al. (2004). Emotional attribution in high-functioning individuals with autistic spectrum disorder: A functional imaging study. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 43, 473–480.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  328. Pine, E., Luby, J., Abbacchi, A., & Constantino, J. N. (2006). Quantitative assessment of autistic symptomatology in preschoolers. Autism, 10(4), 344–352.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  329. Plaisted, K., Swettenham, J., & Rees, L. (1999). Children with autism show local precedence in a divided attention task and global precedence in a selective attention task. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 40, 733–742.Google Scholar
  330. Pollak, S., & Sinha, P. (2002). Effects of early experience on children’s recognition of facial displays of emotion. Developmental Psychology, 38, 784–791.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  331. Prior, M., Dahlstrom, B., & Squires, T. L. (1990). Autistic children’s knowledge of thinking and feeling states in other people. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 31, 587–601.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  332. Rajendran, G., & Mitchell, P. (2007). Cognitive theories of autism. Developmental Review, 27, 224–260.Google Scholar
  333. Reddy, V., Williams, E., & Vaughan, A. (2002). Sharing humour and laughter in autism and Down’s syndrome. British Journal of Psychology, 93, 219–242.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  334. Repacholi, B. M. (1998). Infants’ use of attentional cues to identify the referent of another person’s emotional expression. Developmental Psychology, 34, 1017–1025.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  335. Repacholi, B. M., & Gopnik, A. (1997). Early reasoning about desires: Evidence from 14- and 18-month-olds. Developmental Psychology, 33, 12–21.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  336. Rieder, S., Perrez, M., Reicherts, M., & Horn, A. (2007). Interpersonal emotion regulation in the family: A review of assessment tools. In A. M. Fontaine & M. Matias (Eds.), Family, work and parenting: international perspectives (pp. 17–45). Porto: Legis/livpsic.Google Scholar
  337. Rieffe, C., Meerum Terwogt, M., & Cowan, R. (2005). Children’s understanding of mental states as causes of emotions. Infant and Child Development, 14, 259–272.Google Scholar
  338. Rieffe, C., Meerum Terwogt, M., & Kotronopoulou, C. (2007). Awareness of single and multiple emotions in high-functioning children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37, 455–465.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  339. Rieffe, C., Meerum Terwogt, M., & Stockmann, L. (2000). Understanding atypical emotions among children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 30, 195–203.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  340. Riggs, N. R., Greenberg, M. T., Kusche, C. A., & Pentz, M. A. (2006). The mediational role of metacognition in the behavioral outcomes of a socio-emotional prevention program in elementary school students: Effects of the PATHS Curriculum. Prevention Science, 7, 91–102.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  341. Rimé, B. (2007). Interpersonal emotion regulation. In J. J. Gross (Ed.), Handbook of emotion regulation (pp. 466–485). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  342. Rinehart, N. J., Bradshaw, J. L., Moss, S. A., Brereton, A. V., & Tonge, B. J. (2000). Atypical interference of local detail on global processing in high-functioning autism and Asperger’s disorder. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 41, 769–778.Google Scholar
  343. Robel, L., Ennouri, K., Piana, H. N., Vaivre-Douret, L., Perier, A., Flament, M. F., et al. (2004). Discrimination of face identities and expressions in children with autism: Same or different? European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 13, 227–233.Google Scholar
  344. Robertson, J. M., Tanguay, P. E., L’Ecuyer, S., Sims, A., & Waltrip, C. (1999). Domains of social communication handicap in autism spectrum disorder. Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 38, 738–745.Google Scholar
  345. Rogers, S. J., & Penington, B. F. (1991). A theoretical approach to the deficits in infantile autism. Development and Psychopathology, 3, 137–162.Google Scholar
  346. Russell, J. (1997). How executive disorders can bring about an inadequate ‘theory or mind’. In J. Russell (Ed.), Autism as an executive disorder (pp. 256–304). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  347. Russell, J., Hala, S., & Hill, E. (2003). The automated windows task: The performance of preschool children, children with autism, and children with moderate learning difficulties. Cognitive Development, 18, 111–137.Google Scholar
  348. Russell, J., & Hill, E. L. (2001). Action-monitoring and intention reporting in children with autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 42, 317–328.Google Scholar
  349. Russell, J., Mauthner, N., Sharpe, S., & Tidswell, T. (1991). The windows task as a measure of strategic deception in preschoolers and autistic subjects. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 9, 331–349.Google Scholar
  350. Rutherford, M. D., Baron-Cohen, S., & Wheelwright, S. (2002). Reading the mind in the voice: A study with normal adults and adults with Asperger syndrome and high functioning autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 32, 189–194.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  351. Saarni, C. (1999). The development of emotional competence. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  352. Saarni, C., Mumme, D. L., & Campos, J. J. (1998). Emotional development: Action, communication, and understanding. In W. Damon (Ed.), Handbook of child psychology, 5th Edition: Social, emotional, and personality development (pp. 237–309). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  353. Salovey, P. (2003). Introduction: Emotion and social processes. In R. Davidson, H. H. Goldsmith, & K. Scherer (Eds.), The handbook of affective science (pp. 747–751). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  354. Salovey, P., Hsee, C. K., & Mayer, J. D. (1993). Emotional intelligence and the self-regulation of affect. In D. M. Wegner & J. W. Pennebaker (Eds.), Handbook of mental control. Century psychology series. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
  355. Sasson, N. J. (2006). The development of face processing in autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36, 381–394.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  356. Saxe, R., Carey, S., & Kanwisher, N. (2004). Understanding other minds: Linking developmental psychology and functional neuroimaging. Annual Review of Psychology, 55, 87–124.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  357. Scambler, D. J., Hepburn, S., Rutherford, M. D., Wehner, E. A., & Rogers, S. J. (2007). Emotional responsivity in children with autism, children with other developmental disabilities, and children with typical development. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37, 553–563.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  358. Seltzer, M. M., Krauss, M. W., Shattuck, P. T., Orsmond, G., Swe, A., & Lord, C. (2003). The symptoms of autism spectrum disorders in adolescence and adulthood. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 33, 565–581.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  359. Serra, M., Loth, F. L., van Geert, P. L., Hurkens, E., & Minderaa, R. B. (2002). Theory of mind in children with ‘lesser variants’ of autism: A longitudinal study. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 43, 885–900.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  360. Seynhaeve, I., & Nader-Grosbois, N. (2008a). Sensorimotor development and dysregulation of activity in young children with autism and with intellectual disabilities. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2(1), 46–59.Google Scholar
  361. Seynhaeve, I., Nader-Grosbois, N., & Dionne, C. (2008b). Functional abilities and neuropsychological dysfunctions in young children with autism and with intellectual disabilities. Alter, 2(3), 230–252.Google Scholar
  362. Siegal, M., & Varley, R. (2002). Neural system involved in Theory of mind. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 3, 462–471.Google Scholar
  363. Sigman, M., Arbelle, S., & Dissanayake, C. (1995). Current research findings on childhood autism. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 40, 289–294.Google Scholar
  364. Sigman, M. D., Kasari, C., Kwon, J. H., & Yirmiya, N. (1992). Responses to the negative emotions of others by autistic, mentally retarded, and normal children. Child Development, 63, 796–807.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  365. Silver, M. (2000). Can people with autistic spectrum disorders be taught emotional understanding? The development and randomised controlled trial of a computer training package. Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation, Hull University, Kingston-upon-Hull, UK.Google Scholar
  366. Silver, M., & Oakes, P. (2001). Evaluation of a new computer intervention to teach people with autism or Asperger syndrome to recognize and predict emotions in others. Autism, 5, 299–316.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  367. Sissons Joshi, M., & McLean, M. (1994). Indian and English children’s understanding of the distinction between real and apparent emotion. Child Development, 65, 1372–1384.Google Scholar
  368. Smith, I. M., & Bryson, S. E. (1994). Imitation and action in autism: A critical review. Psychological Bulletin, 116, 259–273.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  369. Smith, V., Mirenda, P., & Zaidman-Zait, A. (2007). Predictors of expressive vocabulary growth in children with autism. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 50, 149–160.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  370. Snow, M. E., Hertzig, M. E., & Shapiro, T. (1987). Expression of emotion in young autistic children. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 26, 836–838.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  371. Southam-Gerow, M., & Kendall, P. (2002). Emotion regulation and understanding implication for child and psychopathology and therapy. Clinical Psychological Review, 22, 189–222.Google Scholar
  372. Spinrad, T. L., Eisenberg, N., Cumberland, A., Fabes, R. A., Valiente, C., Shepard, S. A., et al. (2006). Relation of emotion-related regulation to children’s social competence: A longitudinal study. Emotion, 6(3), 498–510.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  373. Steele, S., Joseph, R. M., & Tager-Flusberg, H. (2003). Brief report: Developmental change in theory of mind abilities in children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 33, 461–467.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  374. Steerneman, P., Jackson, S., Pelzer, H., & Muris, P. (1996). Children with social handicaps: An intervention programme using a Theory of Mind approach. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 1, 251–263.Google Scholar
  375. Stein, L., Trabasso, T., & Liwag, M. (1993). The representation and organization of emotional experience, unfolding the emotion episode. In M. Lewis & J. M. Haviland (Eds.), Handbook of emotions (pp. 279–300). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  376. Stewart, C. A., & Singh, N. N. (1995). Enhancing the recognition and production of facial expressions of emotion by children with mental retardation. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 16, 365–382.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  377. Swettenham, J. (1996). Can children with autism be taught to understand false belief using computers? Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 37, 157–165.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  378. Swettenham, J., Baron-Cohen, S., Gomez, J.-C., & Walsh, S. (1996). What’s inside a person’s head? Conceiving of the mind as a camera helps children with autism develop an alternative theory of mind. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, 1, 73–88.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  379. Tanguay, P. (1987). Early infantile autism: A disorder of affect. USA: University of Illinois, Department of Psychiatry.Google Scholar
  380. Tantam, D., Monaghan, L., Nicholson, H., & Stirling, J. (1989). Autistic children’s ability to interpret faces: A research note. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 30, 623–630.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  381. Tardif, C., Lainé, F., Rodriguez, M., & Gepner, B. (2007). Slowing down presentation of facial movements and vocal sounds enhances facial expression recognition and induces facial–vocal imitation in children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37, 1469–1484.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  382. Teunisse, J. P., Cools, A. R., van Spaendonck, K. P. M., Aerts, F., & Berger, H. J. C. (2001a). Cognitive styles in high-functioning adolescents with autistic disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 31, 55–66.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  383. Teunisse, J. P., & de Gelder, B. (2001b). Impaired categorical perception of facial expressions in high-functioning adolescents with autism. Child Neuropsychology, 7, 1–14.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  384. Thirion-Marissiaux, A. F., & Nader-Grosbois, N. (2008a). Theory of Mind “emotion”, developmental characteristics and social understanding in children and adolescents with intellectual disability. Research in developmental Disabilities, 29, 414–430.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  385. Thirion-Marissiaux, A. F., & Nader-Grosbois, N. (2008b). Theory of Mind “belief,’ developmental characteristics and social understanding in children and adolescents with intellectual disability. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 29, 547–566.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  386. Thirion-Marissiaux, A. F., & Nader-Grosbois, N. (2008c). Theory of mind and socio-affective abilities in disabled children and adolescents. Alter, 2, 133–155.Google Scholar
  387. Thompson, R. (1994). Emotion regulation: A theme in search of definition. In N. Fox (Ed.), The development of emotion regulation: Biological and behavioral considerations. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 59(2–3, Serial 240), 25–52.Google Scholar
  388. Toth, K., Munson, J., Meltzoff, A. N., & Dawson, G. (2006). Early predictors of communication development in young children with autism spectrum disorder: Joint attention, imitation, and toy play. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 36, 993–1005.Google Scholar
  389. Tourrette, C. (1999). Apprentissage du monde, interactions sociales et communication. In J. A. Esperet & E. Esperet (Eds.), Manuel de psychologie de l’enfant (pp. 445–478). Sprimont: Mardaga.Google Scholar
  390. Tourrette, C., Recordon, S., Barbe, V., & Soares-Boucaud, I. (2000). Attention conjointe pré-verbale et théorie de l’esprit à 5 ans: La relation supposée entre ces deux capacités peut-elle être démontrée? Etude exploratoire chez des enfants non autistes. In V. Gererdin-Collet & C. Riboni (Eds.), Autisme: Perspectives actuelles (pp. 61–75). Paris: L’Harmattan.Google Scholar
  391. Tracy, J. L., Robins, R. W., & Lagattuta, K. H. (2005). Can children recognize pride? Emotion, 5, 251–257.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  392. Travis, L. L., & Sigman, M. (1998). Social deficits and interpersonal relationships in autism. Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews, 4, 65–72.Google Scholar
  393. Travis, L., Sigman, M., & Ruskin, E. (2001). Links between social understanding and social behavior in verbally able children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 31, 119–130.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  394. Trevarthen, C. (1989). Les relations entre autisme et le développement socioculturel normal: Arguments en faveur d’un trouble primaire de la régulation du développement cognitif par les émotions. In G. Lelord, J. P. Muh, M. Petit, & D. Sauvage (Eds.), Autismes et troubles du développement global de l’enfant (pp. 56–80). Paris: Expansion scientifique française.Google Scholar
  395. Turner, M. (1997). Toward an executive dysfunction account of repetitive behavior. In J. Russell (Ed.), Autism as an executive disorder (pp. 57–100). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  396. Valdivia-Salas, S., Luciano, C., Gutierrez-Martinez, O., & Visdomine, C. (2009). Establishing empathy. In R. A. Rehfeldt, Y. Barnes-Holmes, & S. C. Hayes (Eds.), Derived relational responding: Applications for learners with autism and other developmental disabilities (pp. 301–311). Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications.Google Scholar
  397. van der Geest, J. N., Kemner, C., Verbaten, M. N., & van Engeland, H. (2002). Gaze behavior of children with pervasive developmental disorder toward human faces: A fixation time study. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 43, 1–11.Google Scholar
  398. van Lang, N. D. J., Bouma, A., Sytema, S., Kraijer, D. W., & Minderaa, R. B. (2006). A comparison of central coherence skills between adolescents with an intellectual disability with and without comorbid autism spectrum disorder. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 27, 217–226.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  399. Vaughan, A., Mundy, P., Block, J., Burnette, C., Delgado, C., Gomez, Y., et al. (2003). Child, caregiver, and temperament contributions to infant joint attention. Infancy, 4, 603–616.Google Scholar
  400. Völlm, B. A., Taylor, A. N., Richardson, P., Corcoran, R., Stirling, J., McKie, S., et al. (2006). Neuronal correlates of theory of mind and empathy: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study in a nonverbal task. Neuroimage, 29, 90–98.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  401. Walden, T. A., & Smith, M. C. (1997). Emotion Regulation. Motivation and Emotion, 2, 7–25.Google Scholar
  402. Wang, A. T., Dapretto, M., Hariri, A. R., Sigman, M., & Bookheimer, S. Y. (2004). Neural correlates of facial affect processing in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 43, 481–490.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  403. Warreyn, P., Roeyers, H., & De Groote, I. (2005). Early social communicative behaviours of preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder during interaction with their mothers. Autism, 9, 342–361.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  404. Webster, S., & Potter, D. D. (2008). Eye direction detection improves with development in autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 38, 1184–1186.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  405. Wellman, H. M. (1990). The child’s theory of mind. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  406. Wellman, H. M. (1991). From desires to beliefs: Acquisition of a theory of mind. In A. Whiten (Ed.), Natural theories of mind (pp. 19–38). Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  407. Wellman, H. M. (2000). Early understanding of mind: The normal case. In S. Baron-Cohen, H. Tager-Flusberg, & D. J. Cohen, Understanding other minds: Perspectives from autism and developmental neuroscience (2nd ed., pp. 10–39). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  408. Wellman, H. M., Caswell, R., Gomez, J. C., Swettenham, J., Toye, E., & Lagattuta, K. (2002). Thought-bubbles help children with autism acquire an alternative to a theory of mind. Autism, 6, 343–363.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  409. Wellman, H. M., Harris, P. L., Banerjee, M., & Sinclair, A. (1995). Early understanding of emotion – evidence from natural-language. Cognition & Emotion, 9, 117–149.Google Scholar
  410. Wellman, H., Hollander, M., & Schult, C. (1996). Young children’s understanding of thought-bubbles and of thoughts. Child Development, 67, 768–788.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  411. Wellman, H. M., Phillips, A. T., & Rodriguez, T. (2000). Young children’s understanding of perception, desire, and emotion. Child Development, 71, 895–912.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  412. Werner, E., Dawson, G., Osterling, J., & Dinno, N. (2000). Brief report: Recognition of autism spectrum disorder before one year of age: A retrospective study based on home videotapes. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 30, 157–162.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  413. Whalen, C., & Schreibman, L. (2003). Joint attention training for children with autism using behavior modification procedures. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 44, 456–468.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  414. Whalen, C., Schreibman, L., & Ingersoll, B. (2006). The collateral effects of joint attention training on social initiations, positive affect, imitation, and spontaneous speech for young children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 36, 655–664.Google Scholar
  415. Whitman, T. (2004). The development of autism: A self-regulatory perspective. New York: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  416. Widen, S. C., & Russel, J. A. (2002). Gender and preschoolers’ perception of emotion. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 48, 248–262.Google Scholar
  417. Wing, L. (1986). Clarification on Asperger’s syndrome. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 16, 513–515.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  418. Yeates, K. O., Bigler, E. D., Dennis, M., Gerhardt, C. A., Rubin, K. H., Stancin, T., et al. (2007). Social outcomes in childhood brain disorder: A heuristic integration of social neuroscience and developmental psychology. Psychological Bulletin, 133, 535–556.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  419. Yirmiya, N., Erel, O., Shaked, M., & Solomonica-Levi, D. (1998). Meta-analyses comparing theory of mind abilities of individuals with autism, individuals with mental retardation, and normally developing individuals. Psychological Bulletin, 124, 283–307.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  420. Yirmiya, N., Kasari, C., Sigman, M., & Mundy, P. (1989). Facial expressions of affect in autistic, mentally retarded and normal children. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 30, 725–735.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  421. Yirmiya, N., Pilowsky, T., Solomonica-Levi, D., & Shulman, C. (1999). Brief Report: Gaze behaviour and theory of mind abilities in individuals with autism, Down syndrome, and mental retardation of unknown etiology. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 29(4), 333–341.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  422. Yirmiya, N., Sigman, M. D., Kasari, C., & Mundy, P. (1992). Empathy and cognition in high-functioning children with autism. Child Development, 63, 150–160.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  423. Zelazo, P. D., Burack, J. A., Boseovski, J. J., Jacques, S., & Frye, D. (2001). A cognitive complexity and control framework for the study of autism. In J. A. Burack, T. Charman, N. Yirmiya, & P. R. Zelazo (Eds.), The development of autism: Perspectives from theory and research (pp. 195–217). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  424. Zelazo, P. D., & Frye, D. (1997). Cognitive complexity and control: A theory of the development of deliberate reasoning and intentional action. In M. Stamenov (Ed.), Language structure, discourse, and the access to consciousness. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins.Google Scholar
  425. Zelazo, P. D., Jacques, S., Burack, J. A., & Frye, D. (2002). The relation between theory of mind and rule use: Evidence from persons with autism-spectrum disorders. Infant and Child Development, 11(2), 171–195.Google Scholar
  426. Zeman, J., Cassano, M., Perry-Parrish, C., & Stegall, S. (2006). Emotion regulation in children and adolescents. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 27, 155–168.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  427. Izard, C. E., Huebner, R. R., Risser, D., McGuinnes, G. C., & Dougherty, L. M. (1980). The young infant’s ability to produce discrete emotion expressions. Developmental psychology, 16(2), 132–140.Google Scholar
  428. Maestro, S., Muratori, F., Cavallaro, M. C., Pecini, C., Cesari, A., Paziente, A., et al. (2005). How young children treat objects and people? An empirical study of the first year of life in autism. Child Psychiatry & Human Development, 35, 383–396.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of PsychologyCatholic University of LouvainLouvain-la-NeuveBelgium
  2. 2.Center for Psychology of ReligionCatholic University of LouvainLouvain-la-NeuveBelgium

Personalised recommendations