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Training Staff and Parents: Evidence-Based Approaches

  • Dennis H. ReidEmail author
  • Wendy H. Fitch
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

The benefits of relying on evidence-based treatment for people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have become increasingly apparent. Most notably, reliance on treatment approaches with an established evidence base significantly enhances the likelihood that treatment will be effective and desired outcomes will result for people with ASD. Although controversy continues over what represents a sufficient evidence base in some cases (Detrich, Keyworth, & States, 2008; Shriver & Allen, 2008, Chapter 2), it is clear that many treatment strategies currently exist for people with ASD that are well supported by scientific evidence (see Cuvo & Vallelunga, 2007; Rosenwasser & Axelrod, 2001; Steege, Mace, Perry, & Longenecker, 2007, for summaries).

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Autism Spectrum Disorder Challenging Behavior Applied Behavior Analysis Human Service Agency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Carolina Behavior Analysis and Support CenterMorgantonUSA
  2. 2.Cleveland County SchoolsShelbyUSA

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