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TANF and EITC: A Literature Review

  • Richard K. Caputo
Chapter
Part of the International Series on Consumer Science book series (ISCS)

Abstract

This chapter examines Aid to Families with Dependent Children/Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (AFDC/TANF) and Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) participation as AFDC transitioned into TANF over the study period. Figure 5.1 highlights the general trends in AFDC/TANF participation from the Reagan through G. W. Bush administrations and EITC participation, due to availability of data, from 1990 through the G. W. Bush administration.

Keywords

Food Stamp Internal Revenue Service Labor Force Attachment Welfare Caseload Cash Grant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Wurzweiler School of Social WorkYeshiva UniversityNew YorkUSA

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