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Traditional and Non-traditional Control Techniques for Grinding Processes

  • Jian Liu
  • Chengying XuEmail author
  • Mark Jackson
Chapter

Abstract

Owing to the highly demanding geometric accuracy and surface finish for many modern products, grinding processes have been extensively used in manufacturing industry. However, it is also well-accepted that grinding is one of the most complicated machining processes due to the high nonlinearities, intrinsic uncertainties and time-varying characteristics. Multiple challenging problems exist in the process that limits its overall quality and production in practice. With the increasing demands for higher part geometry accuracy, better surface integrity, more productivity, and other desired product parameters (e.g., minimization of subsurface micro-damage) with less operator intervention, various control methods have been studied and implemented to control position, velocity, force, power, temperature and the Material Removal Rate (MRR) during the grinding process, in order to achieve the desired system performance within certain cost/time. This paper reviews different control strategies in order to provide a guideline for academic researchers and industrial practitioners to improve the final product quality with increased possible process flexibility.

Keywords

Grinding Control systems Mathematical modeling Quality 

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Copyright information

© Springer US 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace EngineeringUniversity of Central FloridaOrlandoUSA

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