Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of the Influence of Frontal Sinus on the Sensitivity of the NIRS Signal in the Adult Head

  • Eiji Okada
  • Daisuke Yamamoto
  • Naoya Kiryu
  • Akihisa Katagiri
  • Noriaki Yokose
  • Takashi Awano
  • Kouji Igarashi
  • Sin Nakamura
  • Tatsuya Hoshino
  • Yoshihiro Murata
  • Tsuneo Kano
  • Kaoru Sakatani
  • Yoichi Katayama
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 662)

Abstract

The sensitivity of the near-infrared spectroscopy signal to the brain activation depends on the thickness and structure of the superficial tissues. The influence of the frontal sinus, which is void region in the skull, on the sensitivity to the brain activation is investigated by the time-resolved experiments and the theoretical modelling of the light propagation in the head. In the time-resolved experiments, the mean-time of flight for the forehead scarcely depends upon the existence of the frontal sinus when probe spacing was shorter than 30 mm. The partial optical path length in the brain, which indicates the sensitivity of the near-infrared spectroscopy signal to the brain activation, in a simplified head model is predicted by Monte Carlo simulation. The influence of the frontal sinus on the sensitivity of the signal depends on the thickness of the skull and the depth of the frontal sinus.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eiji Okada
    • 1
  • Daisuke Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Naoya Kiryu
    • 1
  • Akihisa Katagiri
    • 2
  • Noriaki Yokose
    • 2
  • Takashi Awano
    • 3
  • Kouji Igarashi
    • 2
  • Sin Nakamura
    • 2
  • Tatsuya Hoshino
    • 2
  • Yoshihiro Murata
    • 2
  • Tsuneo Kano
    • 4
  • Kaoru Sakatani
    • 5
  • Yoichi Katayama
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Electronics and Electrical EngineeringKeio UniversityYokohamaJapan
  2. 2.Division of Neurological Surgery, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Care of SpringerCare of SpringerCare of Springer
  4. 4.Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  5. 5.Division of Optical Brain Engineering, Department of Neurological Surgery; Division of Applied System Neuroscience, Department of Advanced Medical ScienceNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan

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