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Turning Ideas into Modeling Problems

  • Peter L. GalbraithEmail author
  • Gloria Stillman
  • Jill Brown
Chapter

Abstract

We show how the nucleus of an idea can be developed into modeling problems for secondary school using principles for problem design enunciated in Galbraith (2007). Once the germ has been developed for a task, the idea can be extended as necessary into related problems closer to the personal experience of the adolescents in secondary school. The issues and contexts secondary students choose to investigate, and the questions that they pose when given free reign or minimal constraints, are illustrated from an Australian modeling challenge. Finally, using these contexts as starting points, it is suggested such situations can be developed to engage students in important teaching issues involving necessary constituents of the modeling process.

Key Words

Assessment Competency/competencies Didactic modeling Emergent modeling ICTMA Mathematical literacies Mathematical modeling Competency/competencies Motivation Scaffold 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter L. Galbraith
    • 1
    Email author
  • Gloria Stillman
    • 2
  • Jill Brown
    • 3
  1. 1.University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  3. 3.Australian Catholic UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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