Intellectual Disability and Adaptive-Social Skills

  • Giulio E Lancioni
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
  • Mark F. O’Reilly
  • Jeff Sigafoos
Chapter

Abstract

Definitions of intellectual disability are available from the three most widely recognized classification systems, namely, the ICD 10 (i.e., the 10th edition of The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health [ICF]; World Health Organization,2001), the DSM-IV-TR (i.e., the textual revision of the 4th edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the Mental Disorders; American Psychiatric Association,2000), and the AAMR 10 (i.e., the 10th revision of the American Association for Mental Retardation’s manual – Mental Retardation: Definition, Classification and Systems of Support; Luckasson et al.,2002).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giulio E Lancioni
    • 1
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
    • 2
  • Mark F. O’Reilly
    • 3
  • Jeff Sigafoos
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of BariBariItaly
  2. 2.ONE Research InstituteMidlothianUSA
  3. 3.University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  4. 4.Victoria University of WellingtonWellingtonUSA

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