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Dialogue, Forgiveness, and Reconciliation

  • Barbara S. Tint
Chapter
Part of the Peace Psychology Book Series book series (PPBS)

Abstract

So goes the difficult work of dialogue, the process by which members of differing groups come together with the hope of increasing understanding and transforming deep-rooted issues of conflict. It is rarely a smooth road; there is no formulaic path to understanding, forgiveness, or reconciliation. In most cases, dialogue requires people to encounter painful feelings that have polarized them for so long and to face themselves and others in ways that lead to new perceptions and relationships. In many historically conflicted communities, dialogue processes are often used to provide safe and structured dimensions to reconciliation among fractured parties. This chapter will explore both the theoretical and practical dimensions of dialogue as a tool in forgiveness and reconciliation and a particular case study where dialogue has served as a platform for moving conflicted parties forward at the intergroup level.

Keywords

Dialogue Process Holocaust Survivor Dialogue Group Conference Center Peace Building 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara S. Tint
    • 1
  1. 1.Portland State UniversityPortlandUSA

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