Advertisement

Chapter 13: Extra Problems

  • Peter K. Dunn
  • Gordon K. Smyth
Chapter
Part of the Springer Texts in Statistics book series (STS)

Abstract

In previous chapters, problems were supplied relevant to the material in that chapter. In this final chapter, we present a series of problems without the chapter context, and often with less direction for modelling the data.

References

  1. [1]
    Bailey, R.A., Simon, L.J.: Two studies in automobile insurance ratemaking. ASTIN Bulletin I(IV), 192–217 (1960)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. [2]
    Breslow, N.E.: Extra-Poisson variation in log-linear models. Applied Statistics 33(1), 38–44 (1984)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    Crossland, N.O.: A method to evaluate effects of toxic chemicals on fish growth. Chemosphere 14(11–12), 1855–1870 (1985)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    Davison, A.C., Hinkley, D.V.: Bootstrap Methods and their Application. Cambridge University Press (1997)Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    Duncan, P.D., Ritter, P.L., Dornbusch, S.M., Gross, R.T., Carlsmith, J.M.: The effects of pubertal timing on body image, school behavior, and deviance. Journal of Youth and Adolescence 14(3), 227–235 (1985)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. [6]
    Dunn, P.K., Smyth, G.K.: Series evaluation of Tweedie exponential dispersion models. Statistics and Computing 15(4), 267–280 (2005)MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. [7]
    Efron, B.: Double exponential families and their use in generalized linear regression. Journal of the American Statistical Association 81(395), 709–721 (1986)MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. [8]
    Geyer, C.J.: Constrained maximum likelihood exemplified by isotonic convex logistic regression. Journal of the American Statistical Association 86(415), 717–724 (1991)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. [9]
    Hand, D.J., Daly, F., Lunn, A.D., McConway, K.Y., Ostrowski, E.: A Handbook of Small Data Sets. Chapman and Hall, London (1996)zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  10. [10]
    Johnson, M.P., Raven, P.H.: Species number and endemism: The Galápagos Archipelago revisited. Science 179(4076), 893–895 (1973)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. [11]
    Maul, A.: Application of generalized linear models to the analysis of toxicity test data. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 23(1), 153–163 (1992)Google Scholar
  12. [12]
    Montgomery, D.C., Peck, E.A.: Introduction to Regression Analysis. Wiley, New York (1992)zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  13. [13]
    Morrell, C.H.: Simpson’s paradox: An example from a longitudinal study in South Africa. Journal of Statistics Education 7(3) (1999)Google Scholar
  14. [14]
    O’Hara Hines, R.J., Carter, M.: Improved added variable and partial residual plots for the detection of influential observations in generalized linear models. Applied Statistics 42(1), 3–20 (1993)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. [15]
    Price, J.J., Field, C.J., Field, E.A., Marr, M.C., Myers, C.B., Morrisse, R.E., Schwetz, B.A.: Developmental toxicity of boric acid in mice and rats. Fundamental and Applied Toxicology 18, 266–277 (1992)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. [16]
    de Silva, H.N., Hall, A.J., Tustin, D.S., Gandar, P.W.: Analysis of distribution of root length density of apple trees on different dwarfing rootstocks. Annals of Botany 83, 335–345 (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. [17]
    Slaton, T.L., Piergorsch, W.W., Durham, S.D.: Estimation and testing with overdispersed proportions using the beta-logistic regression model of Heckman and Willis. Biometrics 56(1), 125–133 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. [18]
    Smyth, G.K.: Australasian data and story library (Ozdasl) (2011). URL http://www.statsci.org/data
  19. [19]
    Publius Syrus: The Moral Sayings of Publius Syrus, a Roman Slave: from the Latin. L. E. Bernard & co (Translated by Darius Lyman) (1856)Google Scholar
  20. [20]
    Telford, R.D., Cunningham, R.B.: Sex, sport, and body-size dependency of hematology in highly trained athletes. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 23(7), 788–794 (1991)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. [21]
    Yang, P.J., Pham, J., Choo, J., Hu, D.L.: Duration of urination does not change with body size. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111(33), 11 932–11 937 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter K. Dunn
    • 1
  • Gordon K. Smyth
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Science, Health, Education and EngineeringSchool of Health of Sport Science, University of the Sunshine CoastQueenslandAustralia
  2. 2.Bioinformatics DivisionWalter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical ResearchParkvilleAustralia

Personalised recommendations