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Storying the Musical Lifeworld: Illumination Through Narrative Case Study

  • David Cleaver

Abstract

In addition to the exploration of the general, music education will continue to benefit from the study of personal meaning from the perspective of the particular. This idea aligns with the field of psychology where a strong case has been made for idiographic perspectives to act not only as support for but also as antidote to the prevalence of nomothetic viewpoints.

Keywords

Narrative Analysis Narrative Synthesis Musical Experience Music Teacher Piano Lesson 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Cleaver
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Southern QueenslandAustralia

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