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The Modernisation Of European Higher Education

National policy dynamics
  • Peter Maassen
Part of the Higher Education Dynamics book series (HEDY, volume 24)

The governance and organisation of European higher education, and especially the traditional research university, are in a state of transformation. This is to a large extent caused by far-reaching change processes in the environments of higher education institutions, including general reforms of the governance and organisation of the public sector, and European integration efforts. The former refers to reforms aimed at improving the effectiveness of governments and the performance of the public sector; the latter includes not only specific higher education initiatives, such as the Bologna process (Corbett 2005), and the creation of a European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT) (Commission 2006a, 2008), but also more comprehensive reforms, such as the Lisbon agenda (Gornitzka 2005, 2007). As a consequence, there is a growing imbalance between demands from socio-economic actors on higher education institutions and the institutional capacity to satisfy these demands (Clark 1998). In addition, many changes taking place within higher education institutions are a result of internal, i.e. intra-institutional, and -disciplinary processes and decisions.

Making sense of these changes and interpreting their effects in a valid and meaningful way is not an easy endeavour. This is caused in the first place by the growing complexity of the governance mode with respect to higher education in Europe. Governmental steering of European higher education takes place through a multi-level governance system in which the decisions at the European/supranational, national, regional and institutional level have become so intertwined that it is in practice very difficult to identify at which level by which actor which initiative or decision was taken that has led to which result.

Keywords

High Education High Education Institution High Education System International Competitiveness High Education Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

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  • Peter Maassen

There are no affiliations available

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