Abstract

This paper describes the development of brain games for e-learning using IBVA4, the fourth version of the Interactive Brain Wave Visual Analyzer (IBVA), an EEG biofeedback system. Unique to this brain wave interface is the complexity of interactivity established between neural signaling and multimedia, which interaction can occur through a Web browser via Internet. This technology enables game design with audio mixing and digital animation by brain wave. Brain wave games exercise and stimulate neural activity, thus accelerating perceptual awareness. Continuous brain wave gaming potentially awakens human awareness, thus enlivening the ability to monitor and control health. Brain wave gaming via Internet creates a brain wave community for users with the IBVA4 hardware and software configured on Apple Intel computers with high-speed Internet connections.

Keywords

Brainwaves biofeedback IBVA nonverbal communication coherence neurological healing 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paras Kaul
    • 1
  1. 1.George Mason UniversityVirginia 22030USA

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