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Financial Aid and Student Dropout in Higher Education: A Heterogeneous Research Approach

  • Rong Chen
Part of the Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 23)

This article draws on theoretical and empirical literature to develop a longitudinal research approach for investigating the possible variations in aid effects on dropout risks. It considers that the student body is heterogeneous and thus may respond to financial aid differently according to their socioeconomic and racial backgrounds. It further identifies key elements in assessing the longitudinal impact of various types of financial aid, and provides an alternative approach for understanding how aid policies could affect dropout risk gaps in higher education.

Keywords

Financial aid socioeconomic differences racial disparities dropout longitudinal analysis main effect bias 

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© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rong Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Education Leadership, Management and PolicySeton Hall UniversityUSA

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