Basic Issues of Human Adaptation to Space Flight

  • Nick Kanas
  • Dietrich Manzey
Part of the The Space Technology Library book series (SPTL, volume 22)

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Achermann, P., A.A. 2004. The two-process of sleep regulation revisited. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine. 75(Suppl.):A37–A43.Google Scholar
  2. Akerstedt, T., Folkard, S. and Portin, C. 2004. Predictions of the three-process model of alertness. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine. 75(Suppl.): A75–A83.Google Scholar
  3. André-Deshays, C., Israel, I., Charade, O., Berthoz, A., Popov, K. and Lipshits, M. 1993. Gaze control in microgravity: 1. Saccades, pursuit, eye-head coordination. Journal of Vestibular Research. 3:331–343.Google Scholar
  4. Bechtel R.B. and Berning, A. 1991. The third-quarter phenomenon: do people experience discomfort after stress has passed? In: A.A. Harrison, Y.A. Clearwater, and C.P. McKay, eds. From Antarctica to Outer Space. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  5. Belenky, G., Wesensten, N., Thorne, D.R., Thomas, M.L., Sing, H.C., Redmond, D.P., Russo, M.B., and Balikn, T.J. 2003. Patterns of performance degradation and restoration during sleep restriction and subsequent recovery: a sleep dose-response study. Journal of Sleep Research. 12:1–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bogomolov, V.V., Grigoriev, A.I., and Kozlovskaya, I.B. 2007. The Russian experience in medical care and health maintenance of the International Space Station crews. Acta Astronautica. 60:237–246.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Borbély, A.A. 1982. A two process model of sleep regulation. Human Neurobiology. 1:195–204.Google Scholar
  8. Buckey, J.C. 2006. Space Physiology. London: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Bukley, A., Lawrence, D., and Clément, G. 2007. Generating artificial gravity onboard the Space Shuttle. Acta Astronautica. 60:472–478.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Cazes, G., Rivolier, J., Taylor, A.J.W., and McCormick, I.A. 1989. The quantitative and qualitative use of the adaptability questionnaire (ADQ). Artic Medical Research. 48:185–194.Google Scholar
  11. Charles, J.B., Bungo, M.W. and Fortner, G.W. 1994. Cardiopulmonary function. In: A.E. Nicogossian, C. Leach Huntoon and S.L. Pool, eds. Space Physiology and Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.Google Scholar
  12. Clarke, A.H., Grigull, J., Müller, R., and Scherer, H. 2000. The three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex during prolonged microgravity. Experimental Brain Research. 134:322–334.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Clément, G. 1998. Alterations of eye movements and motion perception in microgravity. Brain Research Reviews. 28:161–172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Clément, G. 2005. Fundamentals of Space Medicine. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  15. Clément, G. and Pavy-Le Traon, A. 2004. Centrifugation as a countermeasure during actual and simulated microgravity: a review. European Journal of Applied Physiology. 92:235–248.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Clément, G., Moore, S., Raphan, T., and Cohen, B. 2001. Perception of tilt (somatogravic illusion) in response to sustained linear acceleration during spaceflight. Experimental Brain Research. 138:410–418.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Cohen, M.M. 2000. Perception of facial features and face-to-face communications in space. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 71:A51–57.Google Scholar
  18. Cowings. I.S. and Toscano, W.B. 1982. The relationship of motion sickness susceptibility to learned autonomic control for symptom suppression. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 53:570–575.Google Scholar
  19. Cowings. I.S. and Toscano, W.B. 2000. Autogenic-feedback training exercise is superior to promethazine for control of motion sickness. Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 40:1154–1165.Google Scholar
  20. Czeisler, C.A., Weitzman, E.D., Moore-Ede, M.C., Zimmerman, J.C., and Knauer, R.S. 1980. Human sleep: its duration and organization depend on its circadian phase. Science. 210:1264–1267.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Czeisler, C.A., Duffy, J.F., Shanahan, T.L., Brown, E.N., Mitchell, J.F., Rimmer, D.W., Ronda, J.M., Silva, E.J., Allan, J.S., Emens, J.S., Dijk, D.-J., and Kronauer, R.E. 1999. Stability, precision and the near 24-hr period of the human circadian pacemaker. Science. 284:2177–2181.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Davis, J.R., Vanderploeg, J.M., Santy, P.A., Jennings, R.T. and Stewart, D.F. 1988. Space motion sickness during 24 flights of the space shuttle. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 59:1185–1189.Google Scholar
  23. Décamps, G. and Rosnet, E. 2005. A longitudinal assessment of psychological adaptation during a winter-over in Antarctica. Environment and Behavior. 37:418–435.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Dijk, D.-J., Nerl, D.F., Wyatt, J.K., Ronda, J.M., Riel, E., Ritz-De Cecco, A., Hughes, R.D., Elliott, A.R., Prisk, G.K., West, J.B., and Czeisler, C.A. 2001. Sleep, performance, circadian rhythms, and light dark cycles during two space shuttle flights. American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative, Comparative Physiology. 281:R1647–1664.Google Scholar
  25. Dinges, D.F., Pack, F., Williams, K., Gillen, K.A., Powell, J.W., Ott, G.E., Aptowicz, C., and Pack, A.I. 1997. Cumulative sleepiness, mood disturbance, and psychomotor vigilance performance decrements during a week of sleep restricted to 4–5 hours per night. Sleep. 20:267–277.Google Scholar
  26. Flynn, C. 2005. An operational approach to long-duration mission behavioral health and performance factors. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 76 (Suppl.):B42–B51.Google Scholar
  27. Folkard, S. and Monk, T.H. 1983. Chronopsychology: circadian rhythms and human performance. In: A. Gale and J. Edwards eds. Physiological Correlates of Human Behavior, Vol. 2. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  28. Frost, J.D., Shumate, W.H., Salamy, J.G., and Booher, C.R. 1976. Sleep monitoring: the second manned Skylab mission. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 47:372–382.Google Scholar
  29. Gander, P.H., Macdonald, J.A., Montgomery, J.C., and Paulin, M.G. 1991. Adaptation of sleep and circadian rhythms to the Antarctic summer: a question of Zeitgeber strength. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 62: 1019–1025.Google Scholar
  30. Grigoriev, A.I. and Egorov, A.D. 1992. General mechanisms of the effects of weightlessness on the human body. In: S.L. Bonting, ed. Advances in Space Biology and Medicine, Vol. 2. Greenwich: JAI Press.Google Scholar
  31. Grigoriev, A.I., Kozerenko, O.P., and Myasnikov, V.I. 1987. Selected problems of psychological support of prolonged space flights. Paper presented at the 38th Congress of the International Astronautical Federation, Stockholm, Sweden.Google Scholar
  32. Grigoriev, A.I., Kozerenko, O.P., Myasnikov, V.I., and Egorov, A.D. 1988. Ethical problems of interaction between ground-based personnel and orbital station crewmembers. Acta Astronautica. 17:213–215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Gundel, A., Drescher, J., and Polyakov, V.V. 2001. Quantity and quality of sleep during the record manned space flight of 438 days. Human Factors and Aerospace Safety. 1:87–98.Google Scholar
  34. Gundel, A., Nalishiti, V., Reucher, E., Vejvoda, M., and Zulley, J. 1993. Sleep and circadian rhythm during a short-term space missions. Clinical Investigator. 71:718–724.Google Scholar
  35. Gundel, A., Polyakov, V.V., and Zulley, J. 1997. The alteration of human sleep and circadian rhythms during spaceflight. Journal of Sleep Research. 6:1–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Gushin, V.I., Kholin, S.F., and Ivanovsky, Y.R. 1993. Soviet psychophysiological investigations of simulated isolation: some results and prospects. In: S.L. Bonting, ed. Advances in Space Biology and Medicine. Vol. 3. Greenwich: JAI Press.Google Scholar
  37. Howard, I.P. 1986a. The vestibular system. In: K.R. Boff, L. Kaufman, and J.P. Thomas, eds. Handbook of Perception and Performance. Vol I: Sensory Processes and Perception. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  38. Howard, I.P. 1986b. The perception of posture, self-motion, and the subjective vertical. In: K.R. Boff, L. Kaufman, and J.P. Thomas, eds. Handbook of Perception and Performance, Vol I: Sensory Processes and Perception. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  39. Jaweed, M.M. 1994. Muscle structure and function. In: A.E. Nicogossian, C. Leach Huntoon, and S.L. Pool, eds. Space Physiology and Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.Google Scholar
  40. Kanas, N., Slanitskiy, V., Weiss, D.S., Grund, E.M., Gushin, V., Kozerenko, O., Sled, A., Bostrom, A., and Marmar, C.R. 2001. Crewmember and ground personnel interactions over time during Shuttle/Mir space missions. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 72:453–461.Google Scholar
  41. Kanas, N., Weiss, D.S., and Marmar, C.R. 1996. Crewmember interactions during a Mir space station simulation. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 67: 969–975.Google Scholar
  42. Kelly, A.D. and Kanas, N. 1992. Crewmember communication in space: a survey of astronauts and cosmonauts. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 63:721–726.Google Scholar
  43. Kozlovskaya, I.B., Grigoriev, A.I., and Stepantzov, V.I. 1995. Countermeasures for the negative effects of weightlessness on physiological systems on long-term space flight. Acta Astronautica. 36:661–668.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Lackner, J.R. and DiZio, P. 2006. Space motion sickness. Experimental Brain Research. 175:377–399.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Lebedev, V. 1988. Diary of a Cosmonaut: 211 Days in Space. College Station: Phytoresource Research Information Service.Google Scholar
  46. Manzey, D., Lorenz, B., and Polyakov, V. 1998. Mental performance in extreme environments: results from a performance monitoring study during a 438-day spaceflight. Ergonomics. 41:537–559.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Mallis, M.M. and DeRoshia, C.W. 2005. Circadian rhythms, sleep and performance in space. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine. 76(Suppl.):B94–107.Google Scholar
  48. Matsnev, E.I., Yakovleva, I.Y., Tarasov, I.K., Alekseev, V.N., Kornilova, L.N., Mateev, A.D., and Gorgiladze, G.I. 1983. Space motion sickness: phenomenology, countermeasures, and mechanisms. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 54:312–317.Google Scholar
  49. Mollicone, D.J., van Dongen, H.P.A., and Dinges, D.F. 2007. Optimizing sleep/wake schedules in space: sleep during chronic nocturnal sleep restriction with an without diurnal naps. Acta Astronautica. 60:354–361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Monk, T.H. and Moline, M.L. 1989. The timing of bedtime and waketime decisions in free-running subjects. Psychophysiology. 26:304–310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Monk, T.H., Buysse, D.J., Billy, B.D., Kennedy, K.S., and Willrich, L.M. 1998. Sleep and circadian rhythms in four orbiting astronauts. Journal of Biological Rhythms. 13:188–201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Monk, T.H., Kennedy, K.A., Rose, L.R., and Linenger, G. 2001. Decreased human circadian pacemaker influence after 100 days in space: a case study. Psychosomatic Medicine. 63:881–885.Google Scholar
  53. Monk, T.H., Buysse, D.J., Billy, B.T., and DeGrazia, J.M. 2004. Using nine 2h delays to achieve a 6-h advance disrupts sleep, alertness, and circadian rhythm. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 75:1049–1057.Google Scholar
  54. Monk, T.H., Buysse, D.J., and Billy, B.T. 2006. Using daily 30-min phase advances to achieve a 6-hour advance: circadian rhythm, sleep and alertness. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 77:677–686.Google Scholar
  55. Moore, T.P. and Thornton, W.E. 1987. Space shuttle in-flight and post-flight fluid shifts measured by leg volume changes. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine. 58:A91–A96.Google Scholar
  56. Myasnikov, V.I. and Zamaletdinov, I.S. 1998. Psychological states and group interactions of crew members in flight (Reprint). Human Performance in Extreme Environments. 3:44–56.Google Scholar
  57. Nechaev, A.P. 2001. Work and rest planning as a way of crew member error management. Acta Astronautica. 49:271–278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Nicogossian, A.E. and Robbins, D.E. 1994. Characteristics of the space environment. In: Nicogossian, A.E., Leach Huntoon, C., and Pool, S.L. eds. Space Physiology and Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.Google Scholar
  59. Nicogossian, A.E., Leach Huntoon, C., and Pool, S.L. eds. 1994. Space Physiology and Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.Google Scholar
  60. Palinkas, L.A. and Houseal, M. 2000. Stages of change in mood and behavior during a winter in Antarctica. Environment and Behavior. 32:128–141.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Palinkas, L.A., Johnson, J.C., Boster, J.S., and Houseal, M. 1998. Longitudinal studies of behavior and performance during a winter at south pole. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 69:73–77.Google Scholar
  62. Palinkas, L.A., Gunderson, E.K.E., Johnson, J.C., and Holland, A.W. 2000. Behavior and performance on long-duration spaceflights: evidence from analogue environments. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 71:A29–36.Google Scholar
  63. Putcha, L., Berens, K.L., Marshburn, T.H., Ortega, H.J., and Billica, R.D. 1999. Pharmaceutical use by U.S. astronauts on space shuttle missions. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 70:705–708.Google Scholar
  64. Reschke, M.F., Harm, D.L., Parker, D.E., Sandoz, G.R., Homick, J.L., and Vanderploeg, J.M. 1994. Neurophysiologic aspects: space motion sickness. In: A.E. Nicogossian, C. Leach Huntoon, and S.L. Pool, eds. Space Physiology and Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.Google Scholar
  65. Reschke, M.F., Bloomberg, J.J., Harm, D.L., Paloski, W.H., Layne, C., and McDonald, V. 1998. Posture, locomotion, spatial orientation, and motion sickness as a function of space flight. Brain Research Reviews. 28:102–117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Rivolier, J. 1992. Facteurs humain et situations extremés [Human factors and extreme situations]. Paris : Masson.Google Scholar
  67. Rivolier, J., Cazes, G., and McCormick, I. 1991. The International Biomedical Expedition to the Antarctic: psychological evaluations of the field party. In: A.A. Harrison, Y.A. Clearwater, and C.P. McKay, eds. From Antarctica to Outer Space. New York: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  68. Rohrer, J. 1961. Interpersonal relationships in isolated small groups. In: B. Flaherty, ed. Psychological Aspects of Manned Spaceflight. New York: Columbia Press.Google Scholar
  69. Sandal, G.M. 2000. Coping in Antartica: is it possible to generalize results across settings? Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 71:A37–43.Google Scholar
  70. Sandal, G.M. 2001. Crew tension during a space station simulation. Environment and Behavior. 33:134–150.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Sandal, G.M., Vaernes, R., and Ursin, H. 1995. Interpersonal relations during simulated space missions. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 66:617–624.Google Scholar
  72. Santy, P.A., Kapanka, H., Davis, J.R., and Stewart, D.F. 1988. Analysis of sleep on Shuttle missions. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 59:1094–1097.Google Scholar
  73. Selye, H. 1956. The Stress of Life. New York: McGraw Hill.Google Scholar
  74. Steel, G.D. and Suedfeld, P. 1991. Temporal patterns of affect in an isolated group. Environment and Behavior. 23:749–765.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Stoilova, I., Ponomareva, I.P., Myasnikov, V.I., Ivancheva, H., Polyakov, V.V., Zhukova, O.P., and Peneva, N. 1990. Study of sleep during a prolonged space flight: the ‘‘MIR’’ orbiting station. In: K. Broda, ed. Current Trends in Cosmic Biology and Medicine. Ivanka Pri Dunaji: Sloval Academy of Sciences.Google Scholar
  76. Stoilova, I., Zdravev, T., and Yanev, T. 2003. How humans sleep in space – investigations during space flight. Advances in Space Research. 31:1611–1615.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Stuster, J.W. 1996. Bold Endeavors: Lessons from Polar and Space Exploration. Annapolis MD: Naval Insitute Press.Google Scholar
  78. Stuster, J.W., Bachelard, C., and Suedfeld, P. 2000. The relative importance of behavioural issues during long-duration ICE missions. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 71:A17–25.Google Scholar
  79. Suedfeld, P. and Steel, G.D. 2000. The environmental psychology of capsule habitats. Annual Review of Psychology. 51:227–253.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. Van Dongen, H.P.A. 2004. Comparison of mathematical predictions to experimental data of fatigue and performance. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 75 (Suppl.): A15–A36.Google Scholar
  81. Van Dongen, H.P.A., Maislin, G., Mullington, J.M. and Dinges, D.F. 2003. The cumulative costs of additional wakefulness: Dose-response effects on neurobehavioral functions and sleep physiology from chronic sleep restriction and total sleep deprivation. Sleep. 26:117–126.Google Scholar
  82. Wever, R. 1979. The Circadian System of Man: Results of Experiments Under Temporal Isolation. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  83. Wood, J., Lugg, D.J., Hysong, S.J., and Harm, D.L. 1999. Psychologial changes in hundred-day remote Antarctic field. Environment and Behavior. 31:299–337.Google Scholar
  84. Wood, J., Schmidt, L., Lugg, D., Ayton, J., Phillips, T., and Shepanek, M. 2005. Life, survival, and behavioral health in small closed communities: 10 years of studying isolated Antarctic groups. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 76(6, Suppl.):B89–93.Google Scholar
  85. Young, L.R. 1999. Artificial gravity considerations for a Mars exploration mission. Annals of New York Academy of Science. 871:367–378.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  86. Zubrin, R. 1997. The Case for Mars. New York: Touchstone.Google Scholar
  87. Zulley, J. 2000. The influence of isolation on psychological and physiological variables. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 71(9, Suppl.):A44–47.Google Scholar
  88. Zulley, J., Wever, R., and Aschoff, J. 1981. The dependence of onset and duration of sleep on the circadian rhythm of rectal temperature. Pflügers Archive. 391: 314–318.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nick Kanas
    • 1
  • Dietrich Manzey
    • 2
  1. 1.San Francisco and Department of Veterans Affairs Medical CenterProfessor of Psychiatry University of California/San FranciscoSan FranciscoU.S.A
  2. 2.Professor of Work Engineering and Organizational Psychology Department of Psychology and ErgonomicsBerlin Institute of TechnologyBerlinGermany

Personalised recommendations