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Response of Ferritin Over-Expressing Tobacco Plants to Oxidative Stress

  • Éva Hideg
  • Katalin Török
  • Iva Šnyrychová
  • Györgyi Sándor
  • Ernő Szegedi
  • Gábor V. Horváth

Abstract

In order to evaluate the role of ferritin as potential stress protector, stress-induced changes in photosynthetic activity and reactive oxygen production were compared in leaves of control and alfalfa ferritin expressing tobacco plants under a variety of abiotic stress conditions, such photoinhibition by excess photosynthetically active radiation, 290–320 nm ultraviolet radiation or chemically induced oxidative stress. Our results illustrate a protective role of ferritin against the oxidative stress induced through the superoxide hydrogen peroxide hydroxyl radical cascade in the chloroplasts.

Keywords

Oxidative stress reactive oxygen species UV radiation ferritin transgenic tobacco 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Éva Hideg
    • 1
  • Katalin Török
    • 1
  • Iva Šnyrychová
    • 1
    • 2
  • Györgyi Sándor
    • 1
  • Ernő Szegedi
    • 3
  • Gábor V. Horváth
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Plant BiologyBiological Research CenterSzegedHungary
  2. 2.Laboratory of BiophysicsPalacký UniversityOlomoucCzech Republic
  3. 3.Research Institute for Viticulture and EnologyKecskemétHungary

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