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Self-Study Through Personal History

  • Anastasia P. Samaras
  • Mark A. Hicks
  • Jennifer Garvey Berger
Chapter
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 12)

Abstract

The profession of teaching, historically, has struggled with the degree to which the personal experiences of the teacher can or should influence classroom practice. This chapter explores the benefits of including “the personal” both for the teacher and student. Personal history – the formative, contextualized experiences of our lives that influence how we think about and practice our teaching – provides a powerful mechanism for teachers wanting to discern how their lived lives impact their ability to teach or learn. In this chapter, the authors explore the historical evolution of personal history self-study and the multiple ways in which it can promote deeper learning. Specifically, this form of self-study can be used to: know and better understand one’s professional identity; model and test forms of reflection; and, finally, push the boundaries of what we know by creating alternative interpretations of reality. The benefits of this method are further illustrated through a case study of the lived experiences of a teacher educator surfacing her own struggle to “unpack” how her identity impacts her teaching and her quest for modeling self-study as she reshapes a preservice teacher education program.

Keywords

Professional Development Teacher Education Preservice Teacher Personal History Teacher College 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anastasia P. Samaras
    • 1
  • Mark A. Hicks
    • 1
  • Jennifer Garvey Berger
    • 1
  1. 1.George Mason UniversityVirginia

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