Advertisement

Fostering Wisdom: A Psychological Perspective

  • Antje Stange
  • Ute Kunzmann

Keywords

Tacit Knowledge Clinical Psychologist Positive Psychology Procedural Knowledge Factual Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alexander, C. N., & Langer, E. J. (1990). Higher stages of human development: Perspectives on adult growth. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Ardelt, M. (2004). Wisdom as expert knowledge system: A critical review of a contemporary operationalization of an ancient concept. Human Development, 47, 257–285.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Arlin, P. K. (1990). Wisdom: The art of problem finding. In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Wisdom: Its nature, origins, and development (pp. 230–243). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Baltes, P. B. (2004). Wisdom as orchestration of mind and virtue. Berlin: Max Planck Institute for Human Development: http://www.mpib-berlin.mpg.de/dok/full/baltes/orchestr/index.htm (available online).Google Scholar
  5. Baltes, P. B., Dittmann-Kohli, F., & Dixon, R. A. (1984). New perspectives on the development of intelligence in adulthood: Toward a dual-process conception and a model of selective optimization with compensation. In P. B. Baltes & O. G. Brim (Eds.), Life-span development and behavior (Vol. 6, pp. 33–76). New York, NY: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  6. Baltes, P. B., Glück, J., & Kunzmann, U. (2002). Wisdom: Its structure and function in regulating successful lifespan development. In C. R. Snyder & S. J. Lopez (Eds.), Handbook of positive psychology (pp. 327–350). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Baltes, P. B., & Kunzmann, U. (2004). Two faces of wisdom: Wisdom as a general theory of knowledge and judgment about excellence in mind and virtue vs. Wisdom as everyday realization in people and products. Human Development, 47, 290–299.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Baltes, P. B. & Kunzmann, U. (in press). Wisdom and aging: The royal road toward excellence in mind and character. In D. Park & N. Schwarz (Eds.), Cognitive aging: A primer (2nd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
  9. Baltes, P. B., & Smith, J. (1990). Toward a psychology of wisdom and its ontogenesis. In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Wisdom: Its nature, origins, and development (pp. 87–120). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Baltes, P. B., & Staudinger, U. M. (2000). Wisdom: A metaheuristic (pragmatic) to orchestrate mind and virtue toward excellence. American Psychologist, 55, 122–136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Baltes, P. B., Staudinger, U. M., Maercker, A. & Smith, J. (1995). People nominated as wise. A comparative study of wisdom-related knowledge. Psychology and Aging, 10, 155–166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Böhmig-Krumhaar, S. A., Staudinger, U. M., Baltes, P.B. (2002). Mehr Toleranz tut Not: Lässt sich wert-relativierendes Wissen und Urteilen mit Hilfe einer wissensaktivierenden Gedächtnisstrategie verbessern? [In search of more tolerance: Testing the facilitative effect of a knowledge-activating mnemonic strategy on value relativism]. Zeitschrift für Entwicklungspsychologie und Pädagogische Psychologie, 34, 30–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Clayton, V. P., & Birren, J. E. (1980). The development of wisdom across the life span: A reexamination of an ancient topic. In P. B. Baltes & O. G. Brim (Eds.), Life-span development and behavior (Vol. 3, pp. 103–135). New York, NY: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  14. Dittmann-Kohli, F., & Baltes, P. B. (1990). Toward a neofunctionalist conception of adult intellectual development: Wisdom as a prototypical case of intellectual growth. In C. N. Alexander & E. J. Langer (Eds.), Higher stages of human development: Perspectives on adult growth (pp. 54–78). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Dixon, R. A. & Baltes, P. B. (1986). Toward life-span research on the functions and pragmatics of intelligence. In R. J. Sternberg & R. K. Wagner (Eds.), Practical intelligence: Nature and origins of competence in the everyday world (pp. 203–234). Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Dixon, R. A. & Gould, O. N. (1996). Adults telling and retelling stories collaboratively. In P. B. Baltes & U. M. Staudinger (Eds.), Interactive minds: Life-span perspectives on the social foundation of cognition, 221–241. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Ericsson, K. A., & Charness, N. (1994). Expert performance: Its structure and acquisition. American Psychologist, 49, 725–747.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Ericsson, K. A. & Simon, H. A. (1984). Protocol analysis: Verbal reports as data. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  19. Ericsson, K. A., & Smith, J. (1991). Toward a general theory of expertise: Prospects and limits. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Heckhausen, J., Dixon, R. A., & Baltes, P. B. (1989). Gains and losses in development throughout adulthood as perceived by different adult age groups. Developmental Psychology, 25, 109–121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Holliday, S. G., & Chandler, M. J. (1986). Wisdom: Explorations in adult competence. In J. A. Meacham (Ed.), Contributions to human development (Vol. 17, pp. 1–96). Basel: Karger.Google Scholar
  22. Kekes, J. (1983). Wisdom. American Philosophical Quarterly, 20, 277–286.Google Scholar
  23. Kramer, D. A. (1990). Conceptualizing wisdom: The primacy of affect-cognition relations. In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Wisdom: Its nature, origins, and development (pp. 279–313). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Kramer, D. A. (2000). Wisdom as a classical source of human strength: Conceptualization and empirical inquiry. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 19, 83–101.Google Scholar
  25. Kunzmann, U. (in press). Wisdom and Aging. In R. Schulz (Ed.), Encyclopedia of aging (4th edition). New York, NY: Springer.Google Scholar
  26. Kunzmann, U. (2004). Approaches to a good life: The emotional-motivational side to wisdom. In P. A. Linley & S. Joseph (Eds.), Positive psychology in practice (pp. 504–517). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons.Google Scholar
  27. Kunzmann, U., & Baltes, P. B. (2003a). Beyond the traditional scope of intelligence: Wisdom in action. In R. J. Sternberg, J. Lautry & T. I. Lubart (Eds.), Models of intelligence: International perspectives (pp. 329–343). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  28. Kunzmann, U., & Baltes, P. B. (2003b). Wisdom-related knowledge: Affective, motivational, and interpersonal correlates. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 29, 1104–1119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Kunzmann, U. & Baltes, P. B. (2005). The psychology of wisdom: Theoretical and empirical challenges. In R. J. Sternberg & J. Jordan (Eds.). A Handbook of wisdom: Psychological perspectives (pp. 110–135). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Kunzmann, U., & Stange, A. (2007). Wisdom as a classical human strength: Psychological conceptualizations and empirical inquiry. In A. D. Ong & M. Van Dulmen (Eds.), Oxford Handbook of Methods in Positive Psychology, 306–322. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  31. Labouvie-Vief, G. (1990). Wisdom as integrated thought: Historical and developmental perspectives. In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Wisdom: Its nature, origins, and development (pp. 52–83). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  32. McKee, P., & Barber, C. (1999). On defining wisdom. The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, 49, 149–164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Meacham, J. A. (1983). Wisdom and the context of knowledge: Knowing that one doesn’t know. In D. Kuhn & J. A. Meacham (Eds.), On the development of developmental psychology (Vol. 8, pp. 111–134). Basel: Karger.Google Scholar
  34. Meacham, J. A. (1990). The loss of wisdom. In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Wisdom: Its nature, origins, and development (pp. 181–211). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  35. Pasupathi, M., Staudinger, U. M., & Baltes, P. B. (2001). Seeds of wisdom: Adolescents’ knowledge and judgment about difficult life problems. Developmental Psychology, 37(3), 351–361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Reznitskaya, A., & Sternberg, R. J. (2004). Teaching students to make wise judgments: The “Teaching for Wisdom” program. In P. A. Linley & S. Joseph (Eds.), Positive psychology in practice (pp. 181–196). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.Google Scholar
  37. Rice, E. F. (1958). The renaissance idea of wisdom. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  38. Riegel, K. F. (1973). Dialectic operations: The final period of cognitive development. Human Development, 16, 346–370.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Schippan, B., Baumann, K., & Linden, M. (2004). Weisheitstherapie: Kognitive Therapie der Posttraumatischen Verbitterungsstörung [Wisdom therapy: cognitive behavioral therapy of post-traumatic embitterment disorder. Verhaltenstherapie, 14, 284–293.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Sinnott, J. D. (1998). The development of logic in adulthood: Postformal thought and its applications. New York, NY: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  41. Smith, J., Staudinger, U. M., & Baltes, P. B. (1994). Occupational settings facilitating wisdom-related knowledge: The sample case of clinical psychologists. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 62, 989–999.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Sowarka, D. (1989). Weisheit und weise Personen: Common-sense-Konzepte älterer Menschen [Wisdom and wise persons: Common-sense concepts of older people]. Zeitschrift für Entwicklungspsychologie und Pädagogische Psychologie, 21, 87–109.Google Scholar
  43. Staudinger, U. M. (1999). Older and wiser? Integrating results from a psychological approach to the study of wisdom. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 23, 641–664.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Staudinger, U. M., & Baltes, P. B. (1994). Psychology of wisdom. In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Encyclopedia of intelligence (Vol. 1, pp. 143–152). New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  45. Staudinger, U. M., & Baltes, P. B. (1996). Interactive minds: A facilitative setting for wisdom-related performance? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 71, 746–762.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Staudinger, U. M., Lopez, D. F., & Baltes, P. B. (1997). The psychometric location of wisdom-related performance: Intelligence, personality, and more? Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 23, 1200–1214.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Staudinger, U. M., Maciel, A. G., Smith, J., & Baltes, P. B. (1998). What predicts wisdom-related performance? A first look at personality, intelligence, and facilitative experiential contexts. European Journal of Personality, 12, 1–17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Staudinger, U. M. & Pasupathi, M. (2003). Correlates of wisdom-related performance in adolescence and adulthood: Age-graded differences in “paths” toward desirable development. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 13, 239–268.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Staudinger, U. M., Smith, J., & Baltes, P. B. (1994). Manual for the assessment of wisdom-related knowledge. Berlin: Max Planck Institute for Human Development.Google Scholar
  50. Sternberg, R. J. (1985). Implicit theories of intelligence, creativity, and wisdom. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 49, 607–627.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Sternberg, R. J. (1990). Wisdom and its relations to intelligence and creativity. In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Wisdom: Its nature, origins, and development (pp. 142–159). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  52. Sternberg, R. J. (1998). A balance theory of wisdom. Review of General Psychology, 2, 347–365.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Sternberg, R. J. (2001). Why schools should teach for wisdom: The balance theory of wisdom in educational settings. Educational Psychologist, 36, 227–245.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antje Stange
    • 1
  • Ute Kunzmann
    • 2
  1. 1.Georgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychology I Life-Span Development Psychology LabUniversity LeipzigSeeburgstraβe 14–20

Personalised recommendations