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Learning in and as Participation: A Case Study from Health-Promoting Schools

  • Venka Simovska

Drawing on theoretical discussion and the vitality of an empirically-based case study, this chapter documents, explores, and reflects on processes of learning about health through participation and action. The study is positioned within the democratic health-promoting schools tradition which emphasises a critical approach to the issue of student participation and the importance of taking action as part of learning about health. The chapter begins with discussion of the health-promoting schools initiative in Europe as exemplified by the European Network of the Health Promoting Schools, the position of the concept of participation within the frames of the health-promoting schools approach, and its implications for the ways we look at learning. Then, a model distinguishing two different qualities of participation, (token and genuine), is considered.

Keywords learning, student participation, health education, health-promoting schools, action competence

Keywords

Student Participation Knowledge Building Proximal Development Sociocultural Perspective Action Competence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Venka Simovska
    • 1
  1. 1.Danish School of EducationUniversity of AarhusCopenhagenDenmark

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