Phosphate solubilizing bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere soil and its growth promotion on black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) cuttings

  • K. Ramachandran
  • V. Srinivasan
  • S. Hamza
  • M. Anandaraj
Chapter

Abstract

Bacterial isolates from the rhizosphere soil and root cuttings of bush black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) (pepper raised by laterals) exhibiting high phosphate solubilizing ability in-vitro is described in this paper. Microbial phosphorus solubilization (MPS) trait was analyzed by determining the P solubilization efficiency E (E = Diameter of bacterial growth/Diameter of clearing zone×100). The highest P solubilization efficiency was demonstrated by the isolate PB-21 followed by the isolate PB-16: which was identified as Pseudomonas sp. All isolates under study released inorganic phosphate from tricalcium phosphate (TCP) indicating the potential of these strains to release soluble inorganic phosphates from fixed phosphate sources for plant uptake. The isolate PIAR6-2 was able to solubilize 20.01% of P and also fix atmospheric nitrogen, which was later identified as the nitrogen fixing Azospirillum sp. Greenhouse trials using two systems; viz; Soil:Terracare (composted coir pith) and Sand:Soil:FYM with three experimental sets such as rock phosphate (RP as an external P source), PSB isolate in combination with VAM and PSB isolate alone, all against their respective control sets showed very clearly the growth promoting activity of phosphate solubilizing bacteria. Field studies were also carried out using these isolates and some promising results were obtained. Further studies are required to analyze these strains to confirm its plant growth promoting properties. The in-vitro analyses and greenhouse studies of these bacteria reflect their potentiality as efficient P solubilizer in black pepper growing soils.

Key words

Azospirillum composted coir pith greenhouse trial phosphate solubilizing bacteria Pseudomonas rhizosphere 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Ramachandran
    • 1
    • 2
  • V. Srinivasan
    • 1
  • S. Hamza
    • 1
  • M. Anandaraj
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Crop ProductionIndian Institute of Spices Research (ICAR)CalicutIndia
  2. 2.NairobiKenya

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