Ecological Characteristics of Tidal Freshwater Forests Along the Lower Suwannee River, Florida

  • Helen M. Light
  • Melanie R. Darst
  • Robert A. Mattson

References

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helen M. Light
    • 1
  • Melanie R. Darst
    • 1
  • Robert A. Mattson
    • 2
  1. 1.U.S. Geological SurveyFlorida Integrated Science CenterTallahassee
  2. 2.St. Johns River Water Management DistrictPalatka

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