Arts Integration in the Curriculum: A Review of Research and Implications for Teaching and Learning

  • Joan Russell
  • Michalinos Zembylas
Part of the Springer International Handbook of Research in Arts Education book series (SIHE, volume 16)

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joan Russell
    • 1
  • Michalinos Zembylas
    • 2
  1. 1.McGill UniversityCanada
  2. 2.University of Cyprus, Cyprus/Michigan State UniversityU.S.A.

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