Central Congress Politics 1937–9

  • B. R. Tomlinson
Part of the Cambridge Commonwealth Series book series

Abstract

The election victories in 1937 appeared to confirm the Congress claim to be the most powerful political institution in India. In theory, as their election manifesto had stated, the Congress had only fought the P.L.A. elections in order to destroy the 1935 constitutional settlement from the inside. The new strength of the Congress now seemed to put new weapons into the hands of the all-India leaders in their struggle against the British. The central Congress leaders were committed to preventing the federal scheme of 1935 being brought in and to obstructing its working if it were imposed. But in practice, the all-India leaders lost the ability, if not the will, to carry out these threats.

Keywords

Presidential Election Left Wing Constitutional Amendment Working Committee Political Prisoner 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 61.
    J. Nehru to Gandhi 4.2.40 in J. Nehru, A Bunch of Old Letters (Bombay, 1958) p. 427.Google Scholar
  2. 65.
    See R. J. Moore, ‘British Policy and the Indian Problem 1936–40’ in C. H. Philips and M. D. Wainwright (eds), The Partition of India: Policies and Perspectives 1935–47 (London, 1970 ) p. 90.Google Scholar
  3. 90.
    R. Coupland, Indian Politics 1936–42 (London, 1943) p. 264.Google Scholar
  4. 94.
    R. Coupland, Indian Politics 1936–42 (London, 1943) p. 271.Google Scholar
  5. 95.
    See Linlithgow to Amery 21.1.42. N. Mansergh and E. Lumby (eds), India The Transfer of Power 1942–7 Vol. I (London, 1970) no. 23; Amery to Churchill 22.1.42 ibid. no. 27.Google Scholar
  6. 96.
    See Wavell’s record of a conversation with Linlithgow in October 1943 in P. Moon (ed.), Wavell The Viceroy’s Journal (Oxford, 1973) p. 33.Google Scholar
  7. 97.
    See Amery to Linlithgow 10.1.42 N. Mansergh and E. Lumby (eds), India The Transfer of Power 1942–7 Fol. I (London, 1970) no. 9.Google Scholar
  8. 104.
    See H. V. Hodson, The Great Divide Britain-India-Pakistan (London, 1969) pp. 93–4.Google Scholar
  9. 111.
    H. V. Hodson, The Great Divide Britain-India-Pakistan (London, 1969) p. 94.Google Scholar
  10. 112.
    See Amery to Churchill 15.2.42 N. Mansergh and E. Lumby (eds), India The Transfer of Power 1942–7 Vol. 1 (London, 1970) no. 126.Google Scholar
  11. 116.
    See H. V. Hodson, The Great Divide Britain-India-Pakistan (London, 1969) pp. 97–103.Google Scholar
  12. 117.
    Amery to Linlithgow 13.2.42 N. Mansergh and E. Lumby (eds), India The Transfer of Power 1942–7 Vol. 1 (London, 1970) no. 112.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© B. R. Tomlinson 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. R. Tomlinson

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