Classic Papers in Combinatorics pp 361-379

Part of the Modern Birkhäuser Classics book series (MBC) | Cite as

Paths, Trees, and Flowers

  • Jack Edmonds

Abstract

A graph G for purposes here is a finite set of elements called vertices and a finite set of elements called edges such that each edge meets exactly two vertices, called the end-points of the edge. An edge is said to join its end-points.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Boston, a part of Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack Edmonds
    • 1
  1. 1.National Bureau of Standards and Princeton UniversityUSA

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