An Analysis of Bias Regarding Circumcision in American Medical Literature

  • Paul M. Fleiss

Abstract

Publication bias is a multi-faceted phenomenon. There is no question that it exists. The question is how to eliminate it. The elimination of publication bias in American medical publishing cannot be accomplished, however, until its most obvious features have been revealed and analysed.

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  • Paul M. Fleiss

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