Political Events, Economic Facts, and Demographic Variables

Abstract

Malaysia is a federation, a democracy, and a constitutional monarchy, but one in which power is strongly centralized. Opposition parties have more scope for gaining power than those in neighboring Asian countries; they can, for example, win control of state governments, but the ruling Barisan Nasional (National Front) coalition tends to counter this by cutting funding to states which vote against it. It also strictly controls the press.

Keywords

Gross Domestic Product Prime Minister Trade Union Foreign Worker Union Leader 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1997

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