Neuropsychological Intervention and Treatment Approaches for Childhood and Adolescent Disorders

  • Margaret Semrud-Clikeman
  • Phyllis Anne Teeter Ellison

Abstract

Information about the child's neuropsychological, cognitive, academic, and psychosocial status forms the basis for designing integrated intervention and treatment plans for children and adolescents with brain-related disorders. Efforts to develop models of neuropsychological intervention have been expanding in recent years. In an effort to provide a framework for linking assessment to interventions, the Multistage Neuropsychological Assessment-Intervention Model is presented. Specific techniques for designing intervention programs addressing academic, psychosocial, and executive function (EF) deficits associated with various childhood and adolescent disorders are summarized.

Keywords

Reading Comprehension Phonological Awareness Specific Language Impairment Social Skill Training Metacognitive Strategy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret Semrud-Clikeman
    • 1
  • Phyllis Anne Teeter Ellison
    • 2
  1. 1.Michigan State UniversityLansingUSA
  2. 2.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA

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