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Daniel Stern (1934–)

Publishing Era: 1963 to the Present
  • Joseph Palombo
  • Barry J. Koch
  • Harold K. Bendicsen
Chapter

Abstract

Daniel Stern was born on August 16, 1934 in New York City. His wife, Nadia Bruschweiler-Stern, is a pediatrician and child psychiatrist, and the Director of the Brazelton Centre of Switzerland. He and Nadia coauthored The Birth of the Mother: How the Motherhood Experience Changes You Forever (1998). His extensive use of empirical observation of the interactions between infants and their mothers formed the basis of his developmental theory. His ideas have served to challenge many long-held beliefs within the field of psychoanalytic developmental psychology.

Keywords

Affect attunement Amodal perception Coherence of form Coherence of intensity structures Coherence of the temporal structures Coherence of motion Coming into being Constructionist approaches Core sense of self Emergent sense of self Evoked companion Interaffectivity Islands of consistency Joint attention Narrative sense of self Physiognomic perception Representations of interactions that have been generalized (RIGs) Self-affectivity Self-agency Self-coherence Self-history Self-invariant experiences Self with others Subjective sense of self Unity of locus Verbal sense of self Vitality affects 

References

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  2. Fonagy, P. (1998). Moments of change in psychoanalytic theory: Discussion of a new theory of pychic change. Infant Mental Health Journal, 19(3), 346–353.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  7. Stern, D. N. (1985). The interpersonal world of the infant: A view from psychoanalysis and developmental psychology. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  8. Stern, D. N. (1989). Developmental prerequisites for the sense of narrated self. In A. M. Cooper, O. F. Kernberg, & E. S. Person (Eds.), Psychoanalysis: Toward the second century (pp. 168–178). New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Stern, D. N. (1990). Diary of a baby. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  10. Stern, D. N. (1993). Why study children’s narratives? The Signal: Newletter of the World Association for Infant Mental Health, 1(3), 1–3.Google Scholar
  11. Stern, D. N. (1998). The process of therapeutic change involving implicit knowledge: Some implications of developmental observations for adult psychotherapy. Infant Mental Health Journal, 19(3), 300–308.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Major Works

  1. Stern, D. N. (1985). The interpersonal world of the infant. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  2. Stern, D. N. (1990). Diary of a baby. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  3. Stern, D. N. (1995). The motherhood constellation: A unified view of parent–infant psychotherapy. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  4. Stern, D. N. (1998). The birth of the mother: How the motherhood experience changes you forever. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  5. Stern, D. N. (2002). The first relationship: Infant and mother. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Stern, D. N. (2004). The present moment in psychotherapy and everyday life. New York: W.W.Norton.Google Scholar

Supplementary Readings

  1. Applegate, J. (Fall, 1989). Mahler and Stern: Irreconcilable differences? Child and Adolescent Social Work, 6(3), 163–173.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Freud, S. (1920). Beyond the pleasure principle (SE, Vol. 18, pp. 7–64). London: The Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psychoanalysis.Google Scholar
  3. Inhelder, B. & Piaget, J. (1966). Cognitive development and its contribution to the diagnosis of some phenomenon of mental deficiency. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 12, 299–319.Google Scholar
  4. Mahler, M., Pine, F., & Bergman, A. (1975). The psychological birth of the human infant: Symbiosis and individuation. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  5. Piaget, J. (1954). The construction of reality in the child. Translation by M. Cook. First published in 1937. New York: Basic Books.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Vygotsky, L. S. (1962). Thought and language. Translated by E. Haufmann and G. Vakar. Cambridge, MA: M.I.T. Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Winnicott, D. W. (1963). From dependence towards independence in the development of the individual. The maturational zprocess and the facilitating environment. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph Palombo
    • 1
  • Barry J. Koch
    • 2
  • Harold K. Bendicsen
    • 2
  1. 1.Highland Park ILUSA
  2. 2.Castle Rock COUSA

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