Role of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in the Treatment of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

Chapter
Part of the Cancer Treatment and Research book series (CTAR, volume 144)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Oncology-HematologyUniversity of Nebraska Medical Center, 987680 Nebraska Medical CenterOmahaUSA

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