Causes, Prevention, and Mitigation Workgroup Report

  • Gina Perovich
  • Quay Dortch
  • James Goodrich
  • Paul S Berger
  • Justin Brooks
  • Terence J Evens
  • Christopher J Gobler
  • Jennifer Graham
  • James Hyde
  • Dawn Karner
  • Dennis (Kevin) O’Shea
  • Valerie Paul
  • Hans Paerl
  • Michael Piehler
  • Barry H Rosen
  • Mary Santelmann
  • Pat Tester
  • Judy Westrick
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 619)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gina Perovich
  • Quay Dortch
  • James Goodrich
  • Paul S Berger
  • Justin Brooks
  • Terence J Evens
  • Christopher J Gobler
  • Jennifer Graham
  • James Hyde
  • Dawn Karner
  • Dennis (Kevin) O’Shea
  • Valerie Paul
  • Hans Paerl
  • Michael Piehler
  • Barry H Rosen
  • Mary Santelmann
  • Pat Tester
  • Judy Westrick

There are no affiliations available

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