Urban Ecology pp 123-141 | Cite as

Integrated Approaches to Long-Term Studies of Urban Ecological Systems

  • Nancy B. Grimm
  • J. Morgan Grove
  • Steward T.A. Pickett
  • Charles L. Redman

Keywords

long term ecological research Phoenix Baltimore Watershed dynamics patch dynamics scale land cover hydrology human social system ecosystem 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy B. Grimm
    • 1
  • J. Morgan Grove
  • Steward T.A. Pickett
  • Charles L. Redman
  1. 1.Department of BiologyArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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