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Family Resemblances: A Brief Overview of History, Anthropology, and Historical Archaeology in the United States

  • Barbara J. Little
Chapter

Historical archaeologists in the United States work in a variety of professional settings, embrace a wide range of theoretical orientations, choose different methodological approaches for interpreting data, and specialize in diverse techniques. Practitioners get their training in a handful of different academic departments such as anthropology, archaeology, American studies, and history.

Keywords

Civic Engagement Historical Archaeology Cultural Anthropology National Park Service Historic Preservation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.U.S. National Parks ServiceTakoma ParkUSA

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