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Science or Narratives? Multiple Interpretations of the Sannai Maruyama Site, Japan

  • Junko Habu
  • Clare Fawcett

This paper examines the dynamic interaction between scholars, local residents and the mass media at the Sannai Maruyama site, Japan. Sannai Maruyama is an Early and Middle Jomon period site in Aomori Prefecture in northern Japan, dating to approximately 5900 to 4400 cal. B.P. The site was originally excavated as a salvage project by the prefectural board of education prior to the construction of a baseball stadium. This excavation unexpectedly revealed an extraordinarily large Jomon settlement: by the summer of 1994, more than 500 pit-dwellings had been recovered along with numerous other types of features. Following these discoveries, local residents formed a dedicated and effective preservation movement. As a result, in August 1994, the prefectural governor halted the construction of the stadium, and declared that the site should be preserved. Since then, it has been a major tourist attraction in Aomori Prefecture (Habu & Fawcett 1999).

Keywords

Site Archaeologist Multiple Interpretation Archaeological Practice Aomori Prefecture Japanese History 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Junko Habu
    • 1
  • Clare Fawcett
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Department of Sociology-AnthropologySt. Francis Xavier UniversityAntigonishCanada

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